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MsOffice Index 1
| MsOffice Index 1I | Microsoft Mac Office 8.0 | Microsoft PowerPoint 97 | Microsoft Office XP | Microsoft Bug of the Month | Microsoft Macro Virus from MacOffice |      Updated 12/14/05

Welcome to Bohunky0's Microsoft Power Point Page

Software Page 1 Software Page 2 Microsoft Software Index
  1. Top Ten Tech support questions from users to Microsoft's tech support. If you have a problem with Power Point, this is the place to start
  2. Retro Fit Power Point
  3. Add sounds effects and music to PowerPoint (U.S. only)-A Microsoft site
    Choose from an online library of sounds for a more creative presentation that will wow your audience.
  4. Invert Flipping Text in PowerPoint
  5. Can I view PPT slides without PowerPoint?
  6. CREATE CUSTOM SOUNDS FOR POWERPOINT SLIDES
  7. To insert music that continues as the slide presentation runs. You know how to assign a music file to one slide, but you want it to continue uninterrupted throughout the entire presentationn.
  8. PRODUCING A REMOTE POWERPOINT PRESENTATION
  9. EDITING POINTS IN POWERPOINT
  10. NUMBERED TEXT IN POWERPOINT
  11. USING ANIMATION IN HTML POWERPOINT SLIDE SHOWS
  12. PowerPoint 97 Update: HTML Script Vulnerability
  13. ANIMATING A PASTED EXCEL CHART IN POWERPOINT
  14. USING TRANSPARENT LABELS IN POWERPOINT
  15. GETTING PICTURES INTO POWERPOINT SLIDES
  16. TIMING IN POWERPOINT
  17. CREATING DIAGRAMS IN POWERPOINT
  18. TRANSPARENT CLIPART IN POWERPOINT
  19. USING BRANCHING TO CREATE A POWERPOINT SLIDE SHOW
  20. UPDATING POWERPOINT LINKS
  21. A POWERPOINT VISUAL EFFECT
  22. Upgrading from Power Point 97 to 2000? You may receive this error message "PowerPoint couldn't open the Visual Basic for Applications project in presentation C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office\ppmusic.ppa"
  23. DRAWING CLOSED OBJECTS IN POWERPOINT
  24. MOVE AND HIDE IN POWERPOINT
  25. WOW reader, John O. writes; "Providing speaker's notes to your audience "
  26. STYLING WORDART IN POWERPOINT
  27. USE WIZARDS AND TEMPLATES TO CREATE POWERPOINT SLIDE SHOWS
  28. USE THE POWERPOINT SLIDE MASTER
  29. ANIMATING CHARTS IN POWERPOINT
  30. SET UP A BLANK LAST SCREEN IN A POWERPOINT SLIDE SHOW
  31. INSERT PICTURES IN POWERPOINT USING A MACRO
  32. FLYING AIRPLANE ANIMATION FOR POWERPOINT SLIDES
  33. RUNNING A SLIDE SHOW WITHOUT OPENING POWERPOINT
  34. HIDING OBJECTS IN POWERPOINT
  35. CREATING CUSTOM SOUNDS FOR POWERPOINT SLIDES
  36. SETTING UP A BLANK LAST SCREEN IN A POWERPOINT SLIDE SHOW
  37. INSERTING PICTURES IN POWERPOINT USING A MACRO
  38. Inserting A Movie from a file and Powerpoint gives error message, "powerpoint has found an error that it can't correct. please save,exit and restart powerpoint".
  39. If you are unable to insert an Apple Quick Time Movie
  40. PASTING UNFORMATTED TEXT IN EXCEL AND POWERPOINT
  41. How to Export a Word Outline
  42. Save PowerPoint Slide Show Format
  43. Use AutoLayouts to Create Uniform Designs
  44. POWERPOINT PRESENTATION FILE TYPES
  45. POWERPOINT TEMPLATES
  46. TURN PICTURES INTO A PRESENTATION
  47. CHANGING YOUR "BLANK" POWERPOINT PRESENTATION
  48. Music files inside a presentation
    This is a Lockergnome instruction set, but it is worth reading.
  49. Datasheet Quick Tricks
  50. Powerpoint: Navigate With Action Buttons
  51. Run a Song Through an Entire Large Slide Show
  52. Inserting Pictures - The Official Method
  53. Embedding a Microsoft Excel Worksheet into a Slide
  54. Supercharge Powerpoint
  55. Combine Multiple PowerPoint Presentations Into One
Software Page 1 Software Page 2 Microsoft Software Index

Combine Multiple PowerPoint Presentations Into One

PowerPoint allows you to combine multiple presentations into a single one. You can do this by inserting slides from one presentation into another. 

Here is how:

  1. Open the presentation that has the most slides and switch to Normal view.
  2. From the Insert menu, 
  3. Next you can choose the specific slides you want added to the current presentation and click Insert. 
  4. Click Close and the slides you selected will automatically be added to the open presentation.

Supercharge Powerpoint

Only works for PowerPoint 2003 and above.

You might be excused for thinking that PowerPoint is getting a little long in the tooth. Not much in the way of features have been added to the program in the last few years and creating a presentation is still pretty much a case of assembling slides for viewing one after the other. While it is possible to add movies and audio to PowerPoint presentations and to animate objects, it's still pretty lackluster stuff. If you're like me, you've probably wondered if there isn't something a little more exciting that you can do with your presentation. Surprisingly enough the answer has been around for some time in the form of Producer for PowerPoint. It's a free download and it can turn PowerPoint presentations into multimedia extravaganzas.

Let's skip for now the caution about always making sure your presentation is effective in getting its message across and let's look at the bells and whistles available in Producer for PowerPoint.

Get The Program

Microsoft Producer for PowerPoint 2003 is available from http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=1B3C76D5-FC75-4F99-94BC-784919468E73&displaylang=en . The previous version that was available for PowerPoint 2002 has mysteriously vanished in the last few months. I can't find it any longer on the Microsoft site but there are some copies around on the web and one I found is at http://www.techzonez.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1031 . There is no way to tell how long this previous version will be available. I’d suggest if the above link is still up, that you grab your copy before it disappears for good.

What Producer for PowerPoint offers is a Windows Movie Maker type interface for compiling a multimedia presentation including movies, still images, sound and your PowerPoint slideshow. You can have multiple windows showing multiple elements all on the screen at once. If you're familiar with Windows Movie Maker, you will find that Producer for PowerPoint works in a similar way.

First Steps
A short how to?

Once you have Producer for PowerPoint downloaded and installed, launch it and choose the New Presentation Wizard option and click Ok - it's a good idea to put together a simple presentation so you get an idea as to what is going on. Click Next and choose the default template - this gives you a window for showing videos as well as slides and text. Click Next to continue.

Choose the fonts and colors to use for the display and click Next to type the title for your presentation, the presenter name, and an image to display on the introductory page. You can also type text indicating what the presentation is about. To see the results click Preview - when you're done, close this window to continue. Click Next and select one or more slideshows to import into your presentation. Click Next and import audio and video files to use in your presentation. Click Next, answer No to synchronizing the files and click Finish.

Producer will assemble your presentation for you and, to play it, click the Play button. Notice the movie plays separately to the slide show and watch the progress along the timeline at the foot of the screen. On the timeline are your slides and your movie and audio clips - slides are on the slide track, movies on the video track and audio on the audio 2 track. As the presentation plays, take note of the changes to make to it, these might include changing when video or audio starts, rearranging slides or removing some so they don't play.

Editing Your Presentation
To make changes to your presentation, stop it from playing and click the media tab. Working on the timeline at the foot of the page, move the slides around to reorder them and delete slides from the timeline so they won't play. You can also synchronize movies and sound so everything plays at just the right time.

Supercharge Powerpoint Part 2

In the above instruction sets we looked at the basics of putting together a presentation in Producer for PowerPoint. This it's time to look in more detail at how to configure your presentation so that everything plays when you want it to and exactly how you want it to.

Screen Layout
The Media tab of the Producer for PowerPoint window divides the screen into roughly three areas. A small preview area appears on the right and you can preview elements like movies and slides here. At the top left is are the elements you can include in your presentation including audio, html content, images, slides and video as well as presentation templates, video transitions and effects. This is a holding area - none of these items are actually used in the presentation unless they appear also in the timeline across the foot of the screen.

The timeline is where you compile your presentation and make changes to it. When you remove a slide from the timeline you aren't removing it from your project file or your original PowerPoint presentation; instead you're simply removing it from playing during the presentation. You can drag and drop the same item onto the timeline at different places which lets you reuse an element over and over again if desired.

Understanding Templates
Templates control the on the screen arrangement of items and you can choose a template that places a larger version of the slides or a smaller version on the screen. Some templates have movie content areas and some don't. Decide for yourself how you want the elements laid out on the screen and then find a template that achieves this result (or near enough to it).

You can change templates in the middle of a presentation if you drag a new template to the template track of the timeline at the place the change should be made.

Editing Video
As with Windows Movie Maker you can split movie clips in half and discard pieces from the beginning or end of a clip to edit it. Move to the frame to make the edit and use the Clip menu options to Set a Start Trim Point for removing everything up to this point in the movie or use the Set End Trim Point option to remove everything from the current point forward. Use the Clip, Split option to split the clip in two.

Effects and Transitions
Like Windows Movie Maker, you can add Effects and Transitions to your movie clips. An Effect applies to the movie content itself such as increasing or decreasing the brightness or applying a filter. You can apply multiple effects provided they don't conflict with each other. To apply an Effect, drag and drop it onto the clip on the video timeline.

Video transitions apply to the period of change from one video clip to the next or from one still image to another. You can only apply one transition and you do this by dragging and dropping the transition onto the clip in the timeline. The transition will apply as one clip ends and the next begins.

You can add still images to the slide track of the timeline if you desire or you can place them on the video track - depending on the track they are placed on they will play in a different place on the screen. Effects cannot be applied to slides and neither can they be applied to images on the slide timeline. However, images and video clips on the video timeline can have Effects and Transitions applied to them.

Synchronizing Your Show
When you are using video or audio in your presentation you can synchronize it to your slides so that the slides change at the right time. To do this, click the Synchronize button on the toolbar and select Set Slide Timing and then watch the video as the slides display. When you want to move to the next slide, click the Next Slide button and Producer will record the timing for replay later on.

When a slide contains animation effects, you'll see a Next Effect button rather than a Next Slide one - use this to record the timing for the effects and then, when the Next Slide button reappears, you know the effects are complete and you're ready to move to the next slide.

Playing A Presentation
Producer for PowerPoint presentations are different to those created by Windows Movie Maker - they aren't saved as a single file and, instead, they're saved as a series of files which require a web browser to view them. To publish your presentation,

To learn more about Producer for PowerPoint, visit the Microsoft Download Center at
www.microsoft.com/downloads/search.aspx?displaylang=en and type in Producer 2003 Tutorial to find viewable videos that step you through more of the program's features.


Embedding a Microsoft Excel Worksheet into a Slide

Chances are you've already embedded an object or file created in another program into a PowerPoint slide. Organizational charts, tables, and WordArt objects are all examples of embedded objects. PowerPoint makes it easy to insert these and other objects and files created in a different program into your slides.

Microsoft Excel is a spreadsheet program that can calculate numbers and information, create charts and graphs, and perform many other useful functions. Since Excel is part of the Microsoft Office 2003 suite, it is very useful to use with PowerPoint presentations. It is especially helpful when working with presentations made for financial purposes. In this lesson, you will learn how to embed an Excel worksheet into a PowerPoint presentation.

1. Start Microsoft PowerPoint, select File | New from the menu and select Blank presentation from the task pane.

Microsoft PowerPoint starts with a blank presentation.

2. Select the Title Only layout from the Slide Layout task pane.

Now you're ready to insert the Excel object.

3. Select Insert > Object from the menu.

The Insert Object dialog box appears, You have to select one of the following:

-- Create new: Inserts a new object on the current slide. Click the type of object you want to create in the Object type list, then create the object.

-- Create from file: Inserts an object from an existing file into the current slide. Type the object's file name in the File box or click Browse to locate the file.

4. Click the Create from file option.

The Insert Object dialog box updates so that it includes a text box where you can specify the name and location of the file you want to insert. If you don't know the name or location of the file, you can also look for it by clicking the Browse button.

5. Click the Browse button.

The Browse dialog box appears, allowing you to find and locate the file you want to insert into your slide.

6. If necessary, navigate to your Practice folder.

The file list box is updated to show all the files in the Practice folder.

7. Select the Expenses file and click Insert.

Move on to the next step to insert the "Expenses" Excel worksheet into the current slide.

8. Click OK.

The Insert Object dialog box closes and PowerPoint inserts the "Expenses" Excel worksheet into the current slide.

9. Click the title placeholder and type Trade Expenses.

10. Save your work as Expenses.


Powerpoint: Navigate With Action Buttons

You're certainly familiar with the standard keyboard tricks for navigating between slides in a presentation -- Page Down or the right-arrow key to get to the next slide, for example. But did you know you can easily add buttons to your presentation to navigate not just to the next or previous slide but to specific slides or even Web sites?

It's easy to do with action buttons. You may not have heard of action buttons because they're hiding on the AutoShapes menu of the Drawing toolbar.

To add a pre-defined action button to a slide:

1. Move to Normal view and the slide to which you want to add the button.

2. On the Drawing toolbar, choose the AutoShapes button, then choose Action Buttons. (Alternative: use the Slide Show/Action Button command.)

3. Choose one of the 12 predefined buttons (see illustration in or online edition).

4. Move to your slide work area. You'll notice the mouse changes to a "plus" sign. Drag your mouse to draw an action button on the slide.

5. PowerPoint pops up a dialog box (see illustration in our online edition) for you to select (from a pull-down list) the action to take when the button is clicked during the slide show. For example, you can move to the next, previous, first, or last slide, open a custom show, open a Web page, or run a program.

6. To play a sound, check the Play Sound box and then choose a sound from the pull-down list). If you check the Highlight Click box, PowerPoint briefly highlights the button when you click it (confirming that your click was recognized).

7. If you want to define an action when the mouse moves over the button, click the Mouse Over tab and select the options you desire.

8. Click OK to apply your choices.

Action Buttons Notes:

1. All but one of the 12 predefined action buttons have associated actions built in. For example, the "home" button is predefined to move to the first slide in the presentation. You can change the predefined action of any of these buttons if you wish. The predefined property simply saves you time.

2. To place the buttons on every slide, replace step 1 with this step:

Use the View/Master command, then select Slide Master.

3. To change the defined action of an existing action button on a slide, right-click the button and choose Action Settings on the pop-up menu. Alternatively, single-click the button (to select it) and choose the Slide Show/Action Settings menu commands. Proceed at Step 5 above.


Powerpoint: Datasheet Quick Tricks
Works with PowerPoint 2000 and above

One of the handy PowerPoint features I really like is the simplicity of creating a chart without having to resort to embedding an Excel worksheet into a slide. Instead, I just click on the Insert Chart toolbar button and PowerPoint displays a chart and a datasheet for entering values.

While I'm a dyed-in-the-wool fan of keyboard shortcuts, my colleague is happier using the mouse. Fortunately, there are datasheet shortcuts for each of us.

To select:

Once selected, you can insert or remove the rows or columns. To remove them, simply press the Delete key or right-click (or use the right-mouse key on your keyboard -- it's one of those fat "extra" keys on a 104-key keyboard) and choose Delete. To insert data, right-click (or use the right-mouse key on your keyboard) and choose Insert from the pop-up menu.
Note: when you move away from a datasheet (and click somewhere else), PowerPoint hides the datasheet.  To see it again, double-click on the chart.

Selecting Data For Your Chart

Clicking on the column or row heading isn't just a handy way to select data. Double-click on the row or column heading and you'll exclude that data from the chart without removing the data from your datasheet. PowerPoint dims the column or row to gray so you can still see the now-excluded data. 

To restore the data to the chart, simply double-click the column or row heading again.


Invert Flipping Text in PowerPoint

Reader Dale asks:

How do I "reverse" fonts in PowerPoint 97? I want to make some iron-on t-shirts using text messages.

Answer:

  1. Open PowerPoint
  2. Have PP use a blank presentation
  3. Click View | Toolbars | Drawing
  4. The Drawing Toolbar Appears


Music files inside a presentation
This is a Lockergnome instruction set, but it is worth reading.

Question: I want to include a music file with my PowerPoint Presentation, so it will play automatically the whole way through the "movie." How can I do that?

Answer: Good to hear you want to make sure your presentation "sings," as we hear plenty of boring presentations where the presenter just reads each slide word for word. We'll assume that your presentation has already been put together and is polished, ready for some tango or disco. The music can be in an audio file on your hard drive or it can be on a CD that you'll have with you during the presentation. If it's the latter, you may want to save the music from the CD onto the hard drive to have it all in one place. Here's the procedure:

  1. Roll up your sleeves and go to the title slide.
  2. Click Insert | Movies | Sounds. Select "Sound from File" or "Play CD Audio Track."
  3. Browse the hard drive for the sound file, or specify the CD start and end track. You'll receive a dialog box asking if you want it to automatically play at the start of the presentation.
  4. If you answer "no" to this dialog, PowerPoint will place a speaker icon on the presentation, and you can click on it when you want the music to play.
  5. If you want the music to loop, right-click on the speaker icon, and select Edit Sound Object. Check the "Loop Until Stopped" checkbox. You're ready to boogie with the presentation!

CHANGING YOUR "BLANK" POWERPOINT PRESENTATION
Many of you spend an inordinate amount of time setting up new presentations - getting the right design template brought in, re-arranging masters, probably adding a company logo, things of that nature. In fact, many of you have probably figured out that it's faster to simply open an old presentation, delete the content, run a File | Save As, and bring your old settings across using this brute-force approach.

In fact, there's a much easier way. You can set up a "blank" or "default" PowerPoint presentation. This customized default presentation will appear every time you click on the New button on the toolbar, when you click on File | New | General | Blank Presentation, or when you pick "Blank Presentation" on the PowerPoint 97 or 2000 startup screen.

Here's the easiest way I know to make your own "blank" presentation. Open a presentation that has all the elements you want - the design is set up right, the masters look good, everything's in place. Delete anything you don't want to appear in your new, customzied "blank" PowerPoint presentation - usually that involves deleting all the slides except the first one, and deleting some or all of the text from the title slide, but you can be the judge.

When you're happy with your new "blank" presentation, click File | Save As. In the Save As Type box pick Design Template.

The final step varies depending on which version of PowerPoint you're using. If you're using PowerPoint 97 or 2000, type

Blank Presentation

In the File Name box. If you're using PowerPoint 2002 (the version in Office XP), type

Blank

In the File Name box. In either case, click Save, and you'll have a new "blank" presentation.

If you ever want to go back to having a genuine blank presentation, navigate to c:\Documents and Settings\username\Application Data\Microsoft\Templates, and delete either Blank Presentation.pot or Blank.pot, depending on which version of PowerPoint you're using.

(The \Application Data folder may be hidden on your system. To make sure Windows shows it to you, go into Windows Explorer by double-clicking on My Documents, then click Tools | Options | View and check the box marked Show Hidden Files and Folders. In WinXP, click Start | My Documents | Tools | Folder Options and check the box.)


Can I view PPT slides without PowerPoint?
A reader asks: I'd like to know how to read a PowerPoint file if I don't have that program installed on my PC. Thanks.

Fortunately, the answer is fairly simple. To open a PPT presentation without PowerPoint, you can download a PowerPoint viewer straight from Microsoft. The download may take a while, but the viewer won't take up as much drive space as PowerPoint itself.

We recommend that you download Microsoft PowerPoint Viewer 97 (2002 release) because it supports PowerPoint 97, 2000, and 2002 presentations. However, the 97 Viewer doesn't support some new technologies, including ActiveX controls, so Microsoft's Knowledge Base recommends that you use Internet Explorer 5.0 or above to run PPT presentations. Follow the Knowledge Base link for precise instructions on preparing slides to view in a browser. This process is a bit involved, so if you don't require ActiveX, try the viewer first.

Download viewers for all PowerPoint versions
Download PowerPoint Viewer 97 for PowerPoint 97, 2000, and 2002
MS Knowledge Base: How to view slide shows without PowerPoint
MS Knowledge Base: PowerPoint Viewer cannot show all PowerPoint animations


TOP TIP: TURN PICTURES INTO A PRESENTATION
This tip works if you have PowerPoint 97, 2000 or 2002 (the version in Office XP), although the details vary vastly in each version.

It seems like every presentation I've seen recently contains the entire text of the presenter's speech dutifully transcribed into bullet points on PowerPoint slides. The speaker puts a lot of effort into coming up with slides, ensuring that the slides contain all the details that's fit to print. After expending all that energy on the slides, the speaker seems duty-bound to read the slides, line-by-line, point-by-boring-point, as they appear on the screen. In the end, you have to wonder why there's any speaker at all: the entire presentation flashes by on the screen, verbatim - and you can read it in one-tenth the time it takes the speaker to drone along in the background. Call it the revenge of the bullet point bullies.

This tip involves coming up with a PowerPoint presentation, but instead of concentrating on bullet points and sub-points and sub-sub-sub points ad nauseum, you are charged with focusing on the visual part. Take a handful of pictures and turn them into a presentation.

If you've ever used PowerPoint, you probably think that incorporating pictures into a presentation takes a lot of work: for every picture, you have to create a new slide, click inside of it, click Insert | Picture, jiggle the picture around so it's sized and located properly, then move on to the next slide, and start all over again. A time-consuming pain in the neck.

If you use PowerPoint 2000, you don't need to go through all the hassle. Microsoft has an add-in program called "PowerPoint Photo Album" that does all the work. Best of all, it works very well, and it's free. You can get it by going to office.microsoft.com/downloads/2000/album.aspx and following the instructions there for downloading and installing it.

Once installed, click File | New | General, and pick Photo Album. The add-in asks you to choose which pictures you want to include in your photo album (remember that if you hold down the Ctrl key, you'll be able to select many pictures at once). Click a few more times, and your presentation is ready. Very easy.

Unfortunately, the PowerPoint 2000 Photo Album won't even install on your PC unless you have PowerPoint 2000 - PPT 97 users are out of luck.

In PowerPoint 2002 (the version of PowerPoint in Office XP), it's even easier. You don't need to download or install anything. Simply click Insert | Picture | New Photo Album, choose your pictures, click Insert, then Create. You're given lots of options for layout and captions.

If you're using PowerPoint 97, or if you're looking for more features than Microsoft offers for free, I'd strongly urge you to take a look at a shareware program called the Image Importer Wizard. PowerPoint MVP Shyam Pillai has put together a wizard that allows you to specify custom templates, stick captions on the slide or in the notes, and much more. See
http://www.mvps.org/skp/iiw.htm for details.

Once PowerPoint has created the presentation, you can manipulate it the same way as any other presentation - click and drag slides in the slide sorter, for example, or put text boxes (and those blasted bullet points) any where you like.

In PowerPoint 2002, you can use PowerPoint itself to insert new pictures or change formatting options within a Photo Album by clicking Format | Photo Album. But when you do that, PowerPoint will zap out any animations and transitions you may have applied to the presentation - a real pain. Fortunately, there's a workaround. See
http://office.microsoft.com/assistance/2002/articles/ppEditPhotoAlbum.aspx using the Photo Album. Having the right tools - and knowing where to find them - makes all the difference. 


PASTING UNFORMATTED TEXT IN EXCEL AND POWERPOINT
The Macro
TAMPERING WITH A RECORDED MACRO
Let me take advantage of this opportunity to show you a bit more about Office macros in general. To do that, I'd like you to crank up the Macro Recorder - the little gizmo that looks over your shoulder, and creates macros based on what you do. In theory, you can record your actions, have them stored away in a macro, and "play them back" by running the macro.

I almost never recommend that people use the Macro Recorder. Through no fault of its own, the Recorder isn't capable of recording most macros the way you want them recorded. Most of the time, if you record a macro with the Recorder, it won't "play back" the way you expect it to. Sometimes the problems are so obscure you really need to understand Visual Basic for Applications in order to make heads from tails out of the recorded macro. (A lot of it has to do with the cursor location, and how the Recorder has to guess what you are doing when you click or move the cursor. Details and examples are in the books listed in the preceding section.) Adding injury to insult, PowerPoint has a weird way of storing macros, so you even if you could get the macro to work, you could only make the unformatted paste work for individual presentations.

The Macro
In this case, though, recording a macro can kind of get you kick-started, taking care of several behind-the-scenes details that are a pain in the neck to do by hand. It'll also show you how PowerPoint's macro Recorder doesn't work worth squat. So I'll dispense with my usual Recording caveats and cut to the chase.

Here's how to create a PasteUnformatted macro in Word or Excel - and how you should be able to create one in PowerPoint:

> Start the application - Word, Excel or PowerPoint (the other Office apps don't have macro recorders).

> Copy some text. It doesn't matter where you get the text, or what it is. You just need to put something in the Windows clipboard.

> Click Tools | Macro | Record New Macro.

> In the Macro Name box type something like PasteUnformatted

> If you're using Word, make sure the line "Store Macro In" says "All documents (Normal.dot)" and click OK to start the Recorder.

> If you're using Excel, "Store Macro In" should say "Personal Macro Workbook" (and you'll save yourself a bit of time if you tell Excel to assign this macro to the Shortcut key Ctrl+V). Click OK to start the Recorder.

> If you're using PowerPoint, you are pretty much stuck with putting the macro in a specific presentation, which is a real pain. (Yes, I know there are alternatives, but none of them are much good.) Choose the presentation and click OK to start the Recorder.

> With the Recorder running (you can see it sitting in its own window), click Edit | Paste Special | Unformatted Text (in Word or PowerPoint) or Text (in Excel).

> While you're here, savor the consistency among Office apps. Word is quite different from Excel, and both are quite different from PowerPoint. You can't even record a macro in Access. In Outlook, you can only record a macro if you're using Word as your email editor - and then you're actually using the Word Recorder. But I digress.

> When Word, Excel, or PowerPoint is done with the Paste, click the Stop button on the Recorder.

In the next section I'll show you how to take a look at the macro that was recorded.

TAMPERING WITH A RECORDED MACRO
If you were following along in the preceding section, you now have a recorded macro called PasteUnformatted. What you do next depends on whether you're trying to get PasteUnformatted to work in Word, Excel or PowerPoint.

In Word, click Tools | Macro | Macros and pick PasteUnformatted. Click Edit. You'll see something like the macro I gave you in PASTE UNFORMATTED TEXT IN WORD
More on the Word Macro here

In Excel, you have to "Unhide" your Personal workbook before you can look at the macro. (Ah, consistency among the Office apps. Ain't it wunnerful.) To do so, click Window | Unhide, pick Personal.xls and click OK. At that point, you can see the macro you recorded by choosing Tools | Macro | Macros, clicking PasteUnformatted, then Edit. Here's the macro I recorded:

Sub PasteUnformatted()
  '
  ' PasteUnformatted Macro
  ' Macro recorded 10/24/2001 by Woody Leonhard
  '
  ' Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl+v
  '
      ActiveSheet.PasteSpecial Format:="Text", Link:=False, DisplayAsIcon:= _
          False
  End Sub

  The Recorder sticks in a lot of unnecessary junk. If you go
  into the recorded macro and edit it so it says, simply:

  Sub PasteUnformatted()
      ActiveSheet.PasteSpecial Format:="Text"
  End Sub

  It'll work.
PowerPoint is a basket case. In PowerPoint, click Tools | Macro | Macros, pick PasteUnformatted, and click Edit. Visual Basic for Application appears, and shows you that PowerPoint's Recorder has created a macro that looks something like this:

Sub PasteUnformatted()
  '
  ' Macro recorded 10/24/2001 by Woody Leonhard
  '

  End Sub

  If you've ever seen a macro before you might notice something's not quite right with this recorded macro. The PowerPoint Recorder neglected to record anything! That macro doesn't do a thing.

  I played with it a bit, and discovered that you can paste the contents of the clipboard into the current slide by using the command  ActiveWindow.View.Paste

  But I'll be hanged if I can figure out how to paste text only, or do a Paste Special of any type. If one of you PowerPoint gurus can feed me a clue, please do so! | Please click here


Inserting A Movie from a file and Powerpoint gives error message, "powerpoint has found an error that it can't correct. please save,exit and restart powerpoint".

Q. I have powerpoint 97 and i am using windows 98. i am trying to insert a
movie. i goto "insert", "movie" , "movie from file" and as soon as i click
movie from file. i get an error message "powerpoint has found an error that
it can't correct. please save,exit and restart powerpoint. i did this and it
still wont work. i uninstalled office, reinstalled, downloaded a patch, shut
down the computer, deleted a powerpoint reference from the registry. nothin
works. the strange thing is that the "insert movie from file" has worked
before on this same computer. Do you have any suggestions on how i can fix
this problem?


A. Yep, sure do! This problem may occur when you insert a movie file by pointing to Movies And Sounds on the Insert menu, and then clicking Movie From File.

The problem occurs if you install a third-party party program, such as Apple QuickTime for Windows, that modifies the [mci extensions] section of the Win.ini file. The [mci extensions] section determines which driver the movie file format uses. The native media player in PowerPoint 97 must use the MPEGVideo driver, which makes a call to Mciqtz.drv. If this setting has changed, the problem occurs.

NOTE: This problem may also occur if the Mciqtz.drv file is missing from your system folder. The Mciqtz.drv file is a driver for ActiveMovie.

RESOLUTION

Method 1: Install ActiveMovie

To install ActiveMovie, follow these steps:

  1. Insert the PowerPoint 97 or Office 97 CD-ROM in the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive.
  2. On the Windows Start menu, point to Programs, and then click Windows NT Explorer.
  3. Open the \ValuePack\Amovie folder on the CD-ROM.
  4. Double-click the Amovie.exe file to install Microsoft ActiveMovie.

If ActiveMovie is already installed, you must first uninstall ActiveMovie. Follow the steps above, but when you are prompted to remove ActiveMovie and its components, click Yes. After ActiveMovie is removed, repeat the steps above one more time, and install ActiveMovie.

NOTE: If you have Internet Explorer 4.01 or later, or DirectShow installed, you cannot uninstall ActiveMovie. Use Method 2 instead.

Method 2: Check the MCI Settings

To resolve this behavior, follow these steps:

  1. On the Windows Start menu, click Run.
  2. In the Open box, type sysedit and click OK to display the System Configuration Editor.
  3. Click the System.ini window, scroll down to the [mci] section, and then look for the following lines of information:
    [mci]
          AVIVideo=mciavi.drv
          MPEGVideo=mciqtz.drv 

    If any of the lines are missing, type the line as shown.

  4. Click the Win.ini window; scroll down to the [mci extensions] section, and then look for the following lines of information:
    [mci extensions]
          avi=AVIVideo
          qt=MPEGVideo
          mov=MPEGVideo
          dat=MPEGVideo
          mpg=MPEGVideo
          mpa=MPEGVideo
          mpv=MPEGVideo
          enc=MPEGVideo
          m1v=MPEGVideo
          mp2=MPEGVideo
          mpe=MPEGVideo
          mpeg=MPEGVideo
          mpm=MPEGVideo
          au=MPEGVideo
          snd=MPEGVideo
          aif=MPEGVideo
          aiff=MPEGVideo
          aifc=MPEGVideo 

    If any of the lines are missing, type the line as shown. If any of the extensions are duplicated, such as avi, mpg, or mov, comment out the duplicate line by typing a semicolon at the beginning of the line, as in the example below.

    mpg=ExmplVideo 

    becomes:

    ;mpg=ExmplVideo

  5. Click Save on the File menu, and then close the System Configuration Editor.
  6. Start PowerPoint 97. Point to Movies And Sounds on the Insert menu, and then click Movies From File.
  7. In the Insert Movie dialog box, locate the movie file you want to insert, and then click OK.

If all the references are correct in the System.ini and the Win.ini files, you can insert a movie correctly into PowerPoint 97. By default, the installation of PowerPoint 97 modifies the System.ini and the Win.ini files with the previous information.

MORE INFORMATION

Pre-Condition That Causes the Error Message

To see an example of the problem, prepare your computer. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. On the Windows Start menu, click Run. Type sysedit in the Open box and click OK to display the System Configuration Editor.
  2. Click the Win.ini window; scroll down to the [mci extensions] section, and comment out the following lines (Type REM in front of the command or use the ";" without the quotation marks), by typing a semicolon at the beginning of each line:

    [mci extensions]
          ;avi=AVIVideo
          ;qt=MPEGVideo
          ;mov=MPEGVideo
          ;dat=MPEGVideo
          ;mpg=MPEGVideo
          ;mpa=MPEGVideo
          ;mpv=MPEGVideo
          ;enc=MPEGVideo
          ;m1v=MPEGVideo
          ;mp2=MPEGVideo
          ;mpe=MPEGVideo
          ;mpeg=MPEGVideo
          ;mpm=MPEGVideo
          ;au=MPEGVideo
          ;snd=MPEGVideo
          ;aif=MPEGVideo
          ;aiff=MPEGVideo
          ;aifc=MPEGVideo
  3. Save your changes, and close the System Configuration Editor.

 

Microsoft PowerPoint 97 can only play back QuickTime movies (*.mov files) that use compression schemes with corresponding Media Control Interface (MCI) compatible codecs.

A codec (Compressor/Decompressor) is an algorithm or scheme used to record digital video or audio. For example, when you transmit video over the Internet, the video must be compressed on the sending end and decompressed on the receiving end. A codec can be chosen based upon the user's audio or image quality and image size preferences.

When you read a QuickTime movie, a Video for Windows decompressor decompresses the QuickTime files. If the decompressor does not support the compression method used by the QuickTime movie, it cannot render the movie onto the screen.

WORKAROUND

Create a Hyperlink to the .MOV File

If you do not mind not having your movie play in-place, or not having it play automatically, you can create a hyperlink to the .MOV file, and let the QuickTime player for Windows play the file instead:

  1. Select the object or text you want to assign the hyperlink to.
  2. On the Insert menu, click Hyperlink.
  3. In the Link to file or URL box, click Browse.
  4. Click File under Browse to, and locate the .mov file that you want to play.
  5. Click OK, and then click OK again.

If you are unable to insert a Quick Time Movie from a file try the following:

During the slide show, all you need to do is click the linked object or text. If a valid player is available, it will start and play the Quicktime movie.

Verify That QuickTime Movies Are Not Compatible

If you don't want to create a hyperlink, then before proceeding with any conversions, it is best to verify that the QuickTime movie is not compatible with PowerPoint 97. There is a quick test for this: can Media Player play the movie?

Media Player, or Mplayer.exe, is not the same program as the Windows Media Player. Media Player is shipped with various versions of the Windows operating systems, and is an MCI-compliant device. However, Windows Media Player is a new technology that does not rely on MCI for its capabilities to play various forms of media. Windows Media Player can play a wider range of video and audio formats than can Media Player.

How to verify if the movie is not compatible

To determine the compatibility of the movie:

  1. On the Windows Start menu, click Run.
  2. In the Open box type:

    mplayer.exe
  3. Click OK.

    Media Player is started.
  4. On the File menu, click Open.
  5. Browse to the QuickTime movie that you want to verify. Click Open.

If the QuickTime movie is compatible, then Media Player will open it. If this happens, there may be a problem with PowerPoint 97 or with the MCI settings. For more information, see the above article here

If the movie is not played and you receive an error message in Media Player, the movie is not compatible and cannot be played in PowerPoint 97. To make it compatible, you can convert it to a compatible compression format, using either of the following methods.

NOTES:

The following codecs are those that are present on both the Windows platforms and with QuickTime 4.0. Although there may be other codecs that are available on both platforms, this list contains those that are standard across both platforms and that you can use with little worry:

Standard Compression Formats

The following steps make use of QuickTime 4.0 Pro and cannot be performed with the basic version of QuickTime 4.0. The steps are the same for both Windows and Macintosh versions of QuickTime 4.0. You can use other QuickTime editing programs in place of QuickTime 4.0 Pro; see their documentation for the relevant steps.

Method 1: Convert QuickTime Movies to AVI Format

To convert the QuickTime movies to AVI format:

  1. Start QuickTime Pro, and open the file that you want to convert.
  2. On the File menu, click Export.
  3. Set the Export file type to Movie to AVI.
  4. Click Options, and then click Settings.
  5. In the Compressor group, click the list of compressors and choose one from the previous list. One of the more popular formats is Cinepak, but choose the one that you think works best with the movie.
  6. Make sure to change the extension on the file name to .avi, and then click Save.

Method 2: Recompress the QuickTime Movies with Compatible Codec

To recompress the QuickTime movies with compatible codec:

  1. Start QuickTime Pro, and open the file that you want to convert.
  2. On the File menu, click Export.
  3. Set the Export file type to Movie to QuickTime Movie.
  4. Click Options, and then click Settings.
  5. In the Compressor group, click the list of compressors and choose one from the previous list. One of the more popular formats is Cinepak, but choose the one that you think works best with the movie.
  6. Click Save.

MORE INFORMATION

For more information about QuickTime 4.0, its capabilities, and support, see the following Web page on the Apple Computer Web site:

http://www.info.apple.com/support/quicktime/

The third-party contact information included in this article is provided to help you find the technical support you need. This contact information is subject to change without notice.Blaisdell's Little Corner of the Web in no way guarantees the accuracy of this third-party contact information.

The third-party products discussed in this article are manufactured by vendors independent of Microsoft; we, nor they, make no warranty, implied or otherwise, regarding these products' performance or reliability.


INSERTING PICTURES IN POWERPOINT USING A MACRO

Do you often need to insert the same ClipArt picture at specific locations in your slides? Although you could create a template to do this, why not use a macro? The following macro copies any selected picture and then places the original and the three copies at each corner of the slide. To use the macro, first have a slide open and insert the ClipArt that you want to place in each corner. Size the picture and press Alt-F8 to open the Macros dialog box. Select the name and click Run.

To create the macro, press Alt-F8. Name the macro Corners and then click Create. Enter the code as shown below. Choose File, Save As and name your new presentation. Click Save to continue. The macro is saved along with the slide show.

Sub Corners()

ActiveWindow.Selection.Copy
ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignRights, True
ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignTops, True
ActiveWindow.View.Paste
ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignLefts, True
ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignTops, True
ActiveWindow.View.Paste
ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignRights, True
ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignBottoms, True
ActiveWindow.View.Paste
ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignLefts, True
ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignBottoms, True
ActiveWindow.Selection.Unselect

End Sub


SETTING UP A BLANK LAST SCREEN IN A POWERPOINT SLIDE SHOW

If you're making a presentation, you may want to set the last screen of a slide show to black. To do this, open your slide show and choose Tools, Options. When the Options dialog box opens, click the View tab. Now, select the check box labeled End With Black Slide and click OK to close the dialog box and save your selection.

If you want to end your slide show with some other color on the screen, you can simply create a blank slide at the end of your slide show and set its background color to whatever you want. Let's say you create your blank slide and place it at the end of your slide show. Now, choose Format, Background. When the Background dialog box opens, click the arrow at the right side of the list box and then select More Colors. Select your color from the Colors dialog box and click OK to close the box. Next, back in Background, click Apply to apply your selection to the current slide only.

When you reach your last slide, you can just leave it on the screen until your audience has departed.


CREATING CUSTOM SOUNDS FOR POWERPOINT SLIDES

If you've ever tried to record some sounds to insert into a new PowerPoint slide show, but ended up with nothing but a blank WAV file, the problem could be that you haven't activated the microphone input. Double-click the speaker icon at the bottom right of the Windows taskbar. When the Volume Control dialog box opens, choose Options, Properties. Scroll through the list and locate Microphone. Select the check box to its left and then click OK.

Now the Microphone volume control will appear in the Volume Control dialog box. In the Microphone area of the dialog box, deselect the check box labeled Mute and choose Options, Exit to close the dialog box. You can now run Sound Recorder (c:\Windows\Sndrec32.exe). When the Sound Recorder opens, click the Record button (the button with the red dot) and speak into the microphone. Note the pattern in the scope screen. If the pattern is very small, increase the Microphone volume in the Volume Control dialog box. If the pattern is too large (flattening out), open the Volume Control dialog box and reduce the Microphone volume.

With the volume set correctly, you can run PowerPoint and open the slide to which you want to add the sound. Choose Insert, Movies And Sounds, Record Sound. When the Record Sound dialog box opens, name your new sound and click the Record button. After you finish recording the sound, click the Stop button.

You may encounter some variations in these instructions depending on your specific sound card.


HIDING OBJECTS IN POWERPOINT

When you have a number of animated objects in a single PowerPoint slide, you can improve the effect if you hide objects you no longer need.

Let's see how you can hide objects to enhance your animation effects. Run PowerPoint and open a blank slide. Now choose Insert, Picture ClipArt. When the ClipArt Gallery opens, double-click a picture to insert it and close the Gallery.

Now let's animate the picture. Right-click the picture and choose Custom Animation. When the Custom Animation dialog box opens, click the Effects tab. Next, click the arrow at the right side of the Entry Animation list box and select Fly From Left. Click the Timing tab and select the Animate and Automatically radio buttons. Now click OK to close the dialog box and apply your selections.

When you run the show (choose Slide Show, View Show), your object flies onto the slide from the left side. Now let's make the picture disappear with a single mouse click.

Click the Rectangle tool in the Drawing toolbar (its icon is a rectangle). Use the mouse to draw a rectangle over your animated picture. Now you need to set the rectangle color to match your background. For this example, the background is white. Click the arrow at the right side of the Fill Color button in the Drawing toolbar. When the Fill Color menu opens, select white.

Next you need to eliminate the lines that make up the rectangle. To do this, click the arrow at the right side of the Line Color button and select No Line from the menu.

Finally, right-click the rectangle and choose Custom Animation. When the Custom Animation dialog box opens, click the Effects tab. Click the arrow at the right side of the Entry Animation list box, then select Appear from the list. Click OK to close the dialog box and save your changes.

Now run the slide show by choosing Slide Show, View Show. The animated picture flies in from the left. When you are finished viewing the picture, simply click the mouse button. The figure disappears because the white rectangle now appears over it.


RUNNING A SLIDE SHOW WITHOUT OPENING POWERPOINT

When your audience is waiting expectantly for a professional slide show from you, you want to swing right into a seamless presentation at the touch of a button. You don't even want them to see PowerPoint opening. Try this: Run Windows Explorer and locate your slide show file. Right-click the icon and choose Show. PowerPoint opens and runs your slide show. When the show finishes, PowerPoint closes. Your audience never sees the PowerPoint working window at all.

If you don't want your audience to see you running Explorer, place a shortcut to the file on your desktop. Then, when you're ready to start the show, right-click the shortcut and choose Show.


FLYING AIRPLANE ANIMATION FOR POWERPOINT SLIDES

Here's an interesting idea to create an ascending (or plummeting) airplane in a PowerPoint slide. In this tip, simply rotate the nose of the plane up or down as you drag copies away to create the impression that it is taking off or landing (or crashing!).

To create the show, locate a small plane in ClipArt and insert it onto the slide. Set its animation to Crawl From Left. Next, hold down Ctrl and drag away a copy of the plane. With the copy still selected, choose Draw, Ungroup. Then choose Draw, Group. This will allow you to rotate the plane. Now, right-click it and choose Custom Animation. When the dialog box opens, click the Effects tab and choose Flash Once, Fast from the list. Now click the Timing tab and select the Animate and Automatically check boxes. Click OK to close the dialog box and apply your changes.

Once you've set the animation, continue to drag away copies of the second plane. The idea is to drag as many copies as you need to produce smooth motion. As you drag away each new copy, select Rotate and rotate the plane to point more vertically.

If you drag away each copy, you don't need to set the animation for each one--it takes on the attributes of the one before it.

This technique turns out rather well, although there is a little bit of jerkiness to the downward or upward motion.


INSERT PICTURES IN POWERPOINT USING A MACRO

If your PowerPoint creations call on you to insert a ClipArt picture, then copy it and paste the copies at specific locations in your slides, you can write a macro to do the copying work for you. The following macro copies any selected picture, then places the original and the three copies at each corner of the slide.

First open a slide and insert the ClipArt you want to place in each corner. Size the picture and press Alt-F8 to open the Macros dialog box. Select the name and click Run.

Now press Alt-F8. Name the macro Corners and click Create. Enter the code as shown below:

Sub Corners()

ActiveWindow.Selection.Copy ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignRights, True ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignTops, True ActiveWindow.View.Paste ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignLefts, True ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignTops, True ActiveWindow.View.Paste ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignRights, True ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignBottoms, True ActiveWindow.View.Paste ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignLefts, True ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignBottoms, True ActiveWindow.Selection.Unselect

End Sub

Choose File, Save As and name your new presentation. Click Save to continue. This saves the macro along with the slide show.


SET UP A BLANK LAST SCREEN IN A POWERPOINT SLIDE SHOW

A good way to signal the end of your presentation is to set the screen to black (or some other color) at the end of your slide show.

To do this, open your slide show and choose Tools, Options. When the Options dialog box opens, click the View tab. Now select the check box labeled End With Black Slide and click OK to close the dialog box and save your selection.

If you want to end your slide show with some other color onscreen, simply create a blank slide at the end of your slide show and set its background color to whatever you want. Here's how: Let's say you create your blank slide and place it at the end of your slide show. Now choose Format, Background. When the Background dialog box opens, click the arrow at the right side of the list box and select More Colors. Select your color from the Colors dialog box and click OK to close the box. Next, back in Background, click Apply to apply your selection to the current slide only.

When you reach your last slide, you can just leave it onscreen until your audience has departed.


CREATE CUSTOM SOUNDS FOR POWERPOINT SLIDES

Here is a common PowerPoint problem: Say you need to record some sounds to insert into a new PowerPoint slide show. You have a microphone attached to the sound card, but when you try to record sounds, you get nothing but a blank WAV file.

The most common reason for this problem is that you haven't activated the microphone input. Double-click the speaker icon at the bottom right of the Windows taskbar. When the Volume Control dialog box opens, choose Options, Properties. Scroll through the list and locate Microphone. Select the check box to its left, then click OK.

Now the Microphone volume control appears in the Volume Control dialog box. In the Microphone area of the dialog box, deselect the Mute check box and choose Options, Exit to close the dialog box. You can now run Sound Recorder (c:\Windows\sndrec32.exe).

When Sound Recorder opens, click the Record button (the button with the red dot) and speak into the microphone. Note the pattern in the scope screen. If the pattern is very small, increase the Microphone volume in the Volume Control dialog box. If the pattern is too large (flattening out), open the Volume Control dialog box and reduce the Microphone volume.

With the volume set correctly, you can run PowerPoint and open the slide to which you want to add the sound. Choose Insert, Movies And Sounds, Record Sound. When the Record Sound dialog box opens, name your new sound and click the Record button. After you finish recording the sound, click the Stop button.

You may encounter some variations in these instructions depending on your specific sound card.


ANIMATING CHARTS IN POWERPOINT
MAKING THE CHART
MAKING THE SLIDE
INSERT THE CHART
LIGHTS, CAMERA, ANIMATE
AFTER THE ANIMATION IS OVER

Have you ever seen a PowerPoint presentation where pieces of a graph (or just about any picture, for that matter) fly into place, in response to the presenter's hidden command? It's pretty impressive: pieces of bar charts that scurry up the slide, pointing ever upward; slices of pie charts that pop into place; annotations and callouts that draw your attention to the good, the bad, and the hopelessly banal.

I'm not talking about regular bullet-point animations, the type where each individual bullet point on a slide whizzes or zigs or zags into view. Naw. Those are too easy. (Hint: go into Slide Sorter view, pick the slides you want to have bullet-point animations, and choose from the animations listed in the second drop-down box - the one marked "Preset Animations.")

As you might imagine, there are a few tricks.

MAKING THE CHART

While it's theoretically possible to animate a chart that's made in Microsoft Chart (in Word or PowerPoint, click Insert | Picture | Chart), I strongly recommend against it: Chart is cumbersome, error-prone, it doesn't work like the rest of Office, and you can't do a whole heckuvalot with it. Chart's a throwback to the days when people would buy Word or PowerPoint as standalone applications. Now that Excel is on the scene, Chart can be safely put out to pasture.

If you want to animate a chart in PowerPoint, start in Excel. Type in the data you need, select the data, then click the Chart Wizard icon (it's the one that looks like a bar chart). Follow the steps in the Chart Wizard, and in the last step of the Wizard, stick your new chart on its own sheet.

Take some time getting the chart right. Note that the data in the chart can be entirely bogus (or even non-existent!) if you just want to use Excel's charting tools to come up with a picture that can be animated on your slide.

When you're done, save the .XLS file.

MAKING THE SLIDE      BACK TO START>>

On the PowerPoint side, there's one important trick: the chart has to go into an official "chart placeholder" on your slide. If you simply paste your chart willy-nilly onto a slide - or even into an object placeholder - it won't animate. PowerPoint is picky.

If you haven't yet created the slide that's going to hold the animated chart, choose Insert | New Slide an, in the New Slide AutoLayout dialog, pick one of the three layouts that includes "Chart." (They're all in the second row of dummied-up slides - "Text & Chart," "Chart & Text," or just plain "Chart.")

If you've already created the slide that's supposed to take the animated chart, make sure that it has a chart placeholder. Unless you've done something to alter the slide, it should have at least one placeholder that says "Double-click to add chart." If the slide in question doesn't have a chart placeholder, click Common Tasks | Slide Layout, and choose one of the three "Chart" layouts on the second row of dummied-up slides

INSERT THE CHART              BACK TO START>>

Now that your slide's ready, it's time to bring in the chart. Double-click where it says "Double-click to add chart." (And you though this was rocket science, eh?) PowerPoint, in its infinite wisdom, comes up with a dummy chart and spreadsheet, using Microsoft Chart. Ugh.

Immediately click Edit | Import File, and pick the .XLS file that has the chart you want. Click Open.

PowerPoint will present you with a list of the sheets in the .XLS file. Choose the one with the chart you want, and click OK. PowerPoint sucks in the chart along with its associated data, slings the data into a Microsoft Chart data sheet (ugh again), and leaves you with a nifty little chart on the slide, right where you asked for it. Click once on the slide, to get out of the "Graph" folderol, and you're ready to go.

LIGHTS, CAMERA, ANIMATE!          BACK TO START>>

At this point, there are a thousand different ways to animate your chart, using the Custom Animation dialog box. For example, if you stuck a bar chart on your slide, you can have PowerPoint show each bar on the bar chart, in turn, as you click, by following these steps:

1. Click on the slide and then pick Slide Show | Custom Animation. You'll get the Custom Animation dialog. Check the box next to the chart that you're trying to animate. That tells PowerPoint you want to get at the pieces of the chart, giving them wings, as it were.

2. On the Chart Effects tab, pick the way you want PowerPoint to introduce chart elements on the screen. In this case, you can choose to have all the bars appear at once, or you can have them appear by series (all the bars associated with one column in the spreadsheet appear at once), or by category (all the bars associated with one row appear together). You can also have the bars appear one at a time.

3. Also on the Chart Effects tab, you can pick an Entry Animation - for example, have each bar "dissolve" into place, or wipe or come in with a checkerboard pattern. You can also choose a sound that will play as each bar comes on board - but you only get to choose one sound, and that same sound will play for every bar. (There's a joke in there about humming a few bars, but I digress.) Finally, you can check a box that tells PowerPoint to apply the same Entry Animation to the chart's grid and legend, if it has either or both.

4. The After Animation drop-down box gives you some additional effects that you can use to emphasize your points after the animation is over.

AFTER THE ANIMATION IS OVER      BACK TO START>>

The most effective After Animation effect I've found is the one called "Hide On Next Mouse Click." By using that choice well, you can have your chart appear on a slide, point-by-point, and as soon as you're done making your point with the chart, you can make it disappear, then immediately recap what you've said with a series of bullet points before going on to the next slide. It's not a flashy technique, but it's effective for reinforcing information presented in a chart.

Here's how:

1. Build the chart in Excel using the techniques described above. Then insert the chart onto the slide, using Edit | Import File.

2. Click, resize and drag the chart and text placeholders on the slide, so they're positioned wherever you want them. If you use this technique as I describe it, the chart and the text will never appear simultaneously on the slide - the chart will disappear before the first bullet point comes up on the screen - so you can overlap the two placeholders to your heart's content, running text over the top of the chart, and vice-versa.

3. Click Slide Show | Custom Animation. Check the boxes in front of BOTH the text and chart entries. We're going to animate both the text and the chart.

4. On the Order & Timing tab, make sure Chart appears before Text. That way, PowerPoint will perform all of its animations on the chart before it even shows the first text bullet point.

5. Click the Text entry up in the box marked Check to animate slides, then pick the Effects tab. Set up the animation effects that you want to apply to the bullets in the slide - Fly, Spiral and the like - together with any more advanced effects you would like (Introduce by character, in reverse order, anybody?).

6. Click the Chart entry up in the box marked Check to animate slides, then pick the Chart Effects tab. Use the guidelines I discussed earlier to tart up your chart. At the very bottom, make sure the box marked After Animation says Hide on next mouse click.

7. Press F5 and run through the animation. (Yes, you can click the Preview button in the Custom Animation dialog box, but it only runs a pale imitation of the real thing.) Click slowly.

At first you'll get a slide with the title alone. Then PowerPoint will build your chart, using your custom directions. When the chart's done, click once more and the chart disappears, after which the first bullet point appears on screen. Click through the bullet points and you're done.

This really is a cool use for animation in PowerPoint. Give it a try and you'll see what I mean.

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USE THE POWERPOINT SLIDE MASTER

Slide Master is a special slide. Anything you place on Slide Master will appear on all the slides in a slide show. Suppose, for example, you would like to place some action buttons in every slide for navigation. Let's say you would use a button for Next Slide and another for Previous Slide.

Since you want these buttons to appear on all your slides, choose View, Master, Slide Master. When Slide Master opens, choose Slide Show, Action Buttons and select the Next button. Use the mouse to draw, place, and size your new button. When the Actions Settings dialog box opens, just click OK to close it and use the default settings. Repeat this procedure to place the Previous action button.

You'll see a floating toolbar labeled Master on your screen. Click Close to return to your slide show. The two buttons you placed in Slide Master will appear on each slide in the show, as well as on any new slides you create.


USE WIZARDS AND TEMPLATES TO CREATE POWERPOINT SLIDE SHOWS

There isn't a definite answer to this question as it depends on what you're trying to do, but let's take a look at both methods.

A wizard consists of a series of dialog boxes that ask what elements you want to use in your slide show. To use the wizard, run PowerPoint and select the radio button labeled AutoContent Wizard. Simply click Next, then answer the questions and keep clicking Next until you have answered them all.

If PowerPoint is already running and you would like to use the wizard, choose File, New. When the New Presentation dialog box opens, click the Presentations tab. Double-click AutoContent Wizard to close the dialog box and start the wizard.

Templates are slide shows that have already been set up and designed, but that allow you to make any modifications you need to create your show. To use a template, run PowerPoint and select the Template radio button. Click OK and choose the template that best suits your needs. If you don't see what you need in the Presentations Design area, click the Presentations tab and look through those templates, too.

If PowerPoint is already running, you can choose File, New. When the New Presentation dialog box opens, click the Presentation Design tab.

There is no reason to consider one method preferable to the other. Use the template when it suits you best and the wizard when it seems to work best. Or just start with a blank slide and develop your show from scratch.


STYLING WORDART IN POWERPOINT

You can change the style of WordArt any time you like. All you have to do is click the WordArt text to select it. This opens a floating WordArt toolbar. In the toolbar, click WordArt Gallery (just to the right of Edit Text). Now you can select a new style and click OK to apply it.

You can change even more than the style. If you right-click your WordArt and choose Format WordArt, you can change the colors, lines, size, and position of your WordArt. When you finish making changes, click OK to close the dialog box and save your new settings.


Providing speaker's notes to your audience
Powerpoint users should keep in mind this handy idea from John O:

"Providing speaker's notes to your audience is often a pain, due to the limitations of Powerpoint's printing options. However, if you use the Send to Word tool, you can manipulate the notes in many ways since everything ends up in a big table. But alas, this has some trouble, too.

Powerpoint files sent to Word can be HUMONGOUS, I mean seriously big. So, here are some tips for keeping the file sizes under control:

Change the background to something simple, or even Blank. (Do this just before performing the Send to Word, then you can Undo the change afterward.) Complex backgrounds can add over 100k of files size, per slide, to the Word doc.

When presented with the Send to Word options, choose Paste Link. This creates files a little bigger than just Paste, but only for a few moments...Here's the trick: after the Word doc is ready, use Edit | Links and break all the links.

This is a round-about way to get there, but the file will end up MUCH smaller than if you just use Paste. "

Taken from WOW~Woddy's Office Watch. Get your own copy of WOW by emailing a request to wow@wopr.com


MOVE AND HIDE IN POWERPOINT

You would like to have an object appear at the left side of a PowerPoint slide and then move slowly to the right side. When it reaches the right side of the slide, you would like it to disappear.

Run PowerPoint and open a blank slide. Choose Insert, Picture, ClipArt and double-click a picture to insert it onto the slide. Move the picture to the right side of the slide (its final destination). Next, right-click the picture and choose Custom Animation.

When the Custom Animation dialog box opens, click the Effects tab and then click the arrow at the right side of the first list box under Entry Animation And Sound. From the list, choose Crawl From Left. Now click the arrow at the right side of the After Animation list box and choose Hide After Animation.

Click the Timing tab and select the radio buttons labeled Animate and Automatically. Leave the time at 0 and click OK to apply your animation settings and close the dialog box.

To see how the animation works out, choose Slide Show, View Show.


DRAWING CLOSED OBJECTS IN POWERPOINT

Trying to draw something that resembles mountains in a PowerPoint slide?  You would like to draw a series of mountains, one set behind another, to create a range. You would then like to fill each set of mountains with a different color to give the appearance of increasing distance. The problem with this whole project is that you can't change the fill color inside a series of lines even though you have connected all the ends together. 

You need to use the Freeform tool. To find this tool, choose AutoShapes, Lines. Freeform is the closed object in the center of the bottom row of tools. This tool requires a bit of practice to use properly, but it should let you create your mountain range.


Upgrading from Power Point 97 to 2000? You may receive this error message "PowerPoint couldn't open the Visual Basic for Applications project in presentation C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office\ppmusic.ppa"

Ends up that PowerPoint 97 had an add-in called Custom Soundtrack. The problem is that Custom Soundtrack won't work with PowerPoint 2000, no way, no how. If you installed Custom Soundtrack while you were using PowerPoint 97, and then upgrade to PowerPoint 2000 over the top of PowerPoint 97, poor old PowerPoint isn't smart enough to get rid of the old flotsam - or install the latest version of Custom Soundtrack in its place.

Details (including a good, solid fix) are at

http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q218/5/25.ASP


Top Ten Tech support questions from users to Microsoft's tech support. If you have a problem with Power Point, this is the place to start.

  1. Why do I receive an error message when I insert a clip image into a document or presentation?

  2. Why am I receiving an error message when I start PowerPoint that states PowerPoint could not open a Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) project?

  3. Why am I receiving an error message stating that "there isn't enough memory" or "unable to open" when I insert an organization chart?

  4. Why do I receive an "unexpected error occurred - I/O Error" error message when I click Open on the File menu?

  5. Why does my computer stop responding when I click a shortcut to PowerPoint on the Windows Start menu?

6. Why do I receive an "Installer terminated prematurely" error message when I attempt to install Office 2000?

  7. I am receiving Invalid Page Faults, General Protection Faults, illegal instruction errors, and other unexpected behavior. How can I troubleshoot this?

  8. How do I publish a Web document to a File Transfer Protocol (FTP) site?

  9. I am unable to insert QuickTime movies, but I receive an error message saying that QuickTime is not installed properly. How can I insert a QuickTime movie?

  10. When I open my presentation, there are red "X"s in place of my graphics. How do I get my graphics back?

  11. I receive an error message when I attempt to insert a movie from a selected file. How can I insert the movie and not receive the error message?

  (Yeah, you read that right: Microsoft's "Top 10" list actually has 11 questions. But I digress.)

If any of those questions sound like something that's been, uh, bugging you, hop over to
  http://support.microsoft.com/support/powerpoint/ppt2000/FAQ.asp
and retrieve the answer directly from the Microsoft Knowledge Base - get your answers from the same place that Microsoft's own tech support people use.


A POWERPOINT VISUAL EFFECT

Creating visual effects that use gradients throughout your ClipAr is difficult to describe. Each element of the picture appears in the gradient colors. In this case showing is much better than telling, so here's what you do:

"Run PowerPoint and open a completely blank slide. Choose Insert, Picture, ClipArt and select a scenery type of picture (although any picture will do). Click the picture to select it and size it to fill the entire slide (that's what I like about the scenery pictures-a little aspect distortion doesn't usually hurt them). Next, choose Draw, Ungroup and then, leaving all the picture elements selected, choose Draw, Group. Now right-click the picture and choose Format Object. Click the Colors And Lines tab when the Format Object dialog box opens. Under Fill, click the arrow at the right side of the Color list box and choose Fill Effects.

"In the Fill Effects dialog box, click the Gradient tab and then select the Two Colors radio button. Select two light colors for Color 1 and Color 2. I usually use white as one of the colors. After you make the color selection, click OK to close the dialog box and apply the color selection. Back in Format Object, click OK to close the dialog box.

"I have found that white and a light gray are very effective. Light blue and white also work well. You need to experiment with the two colors to get the effect that suits your needs for a slide show."

Although we agree that light colors are best, we found that even black and white or black and light red are very effective in some pictures.


UPDATING POWERPOINT LINKS

You have a PowerPoint presentation that you  present weekly. There are graphs in the presentation whose data tables link to information in Excel spreadsheets. When you update the links, the PowerPoint data sheets get updated--but not the graphs. You have found that to update the graphs you must go to every slide containing a graph and manually open and close each data sheet. Is there any way to automate this time-consuming task in PowerPoint?

All the links should update when you open PowerPoint. In your PowerPoint presentation, choose Edit, Links. When the Links dialog box opens, click the first link to select it. Then hold down Shift and scroll down to the last link. Click it to select all the links. Select the radio button labeled Automatic and click Close.

The next time you run PowerPoint, you'll get a dialog box asking if you want to update all the links. Click OK and all your links should update. We tried to simulate your situation, and this method worked fine.


USING BRANCHING TO CREATE A POWERPOINT SLIDE SHOW

Over a period of time, you have developed a sort of master control panel for your slide shows. By placing icons on a master slide and then clicking the appropriate icon to branch out and go to that slide show. This is an especially good method to use for in-house, less formal slide shows.

To see what this is doing, run PowerPoint and open a blank slide. Create a simple show with only two or three slides. Choose Insert, Picture, ClipArt and place a picture on each slide so you'll have something to see when you run the show. With the ClipArt in place, choose View, Slide Sorter. Right-click one of the slides and choose Slide Transition. Select the radio button labeled Automatically After and enter 2 seconds. Click Apply To All and then choose File, Save. Name the file S1 and click Save.

Choose File, Close to close the saved show. Now click the New button and repeat this procedure for a second slide show. Name the new one S2, save it, and close the file.

Now we're ready to create the master menu slide. Click New again to open a blank slide. Choose Insert, Object. When the Insert Object dialog box opens, select the Create From File radio button and click Browse. Locate S1 in the list and double-click it. Now click OK to insert the object. Size and locate the picture as you wish.

Right-click the picture and choose Action Settings. Select the radio button labeled Hyperlink To, then click the arrow at the right side of the Hyperlink To list box. From the list, select Other PowerPoint Presentation. When the dialog box opens, locate S1 and double-click it. Click OK, then click OK again in the Action Settings dialog box to close it and record your settings. Repeat this entire procedure using S2.

Finally, choose Slide Show, Set Up Show. Select the check box labeled Loop Continuously Until Esc and click OK to save your changes and close the dialog box.

Choose View, Slide Show to start the show. Click the S1 icon to open and view that show. When S1 finishes, you'll return to your menu slide. Click the S2 icon to view that show.

You can use this procedure to add all of the slide shows you need to the menu slide.


TRANSPARENT CLIPART IN POWERPOINT

You would like to show part of a background drawing through a semitransparent frame. You have even found a ClipArt frame you want to use. The problem is this: You select the frame (the picture) and choose Format, Picture. But in the Format Picture dialog box, you can't set No Fill to semitransparent, so you set the color to white, then select the Semitransparent check box and click OK to apply the selection.

The problem is that you don't get the effect your after. You now have a semitransparent border outside the frame border. This spoils the effect and is of no use to you. Is there a way to make the area inside the frame semitransparent, without getting the semitransparent border?

When you set the fill to any color, you are setting the entire drawing to that color. There are at least two approaches you can use: You can ungroup the picture and make only the glass semitransparent, or you can draw a rectangle to place over the picture and make that rectangle semitransparent. Let's look at the latter approach.

Click the Rectangle tool and draw a rectangle of approximately the correct size over the frame. Let the rectangle slightly overlap the frame to make sure you've completely covered the glass area. Right-click the rectangle and choose Format, AutoShape. Under Fill, click the arrow at the right side of the Color list box and choose white from the list. Select the Semitransparent check box and click OK to close the dialog box and continue.

Finally, click the frame to select it and choose Draw, Order, Bring To Front. This will hide the edges of your rectangle and provide the effect you're after.


CREATING DIAGRAMS IN POWERPOINT

PowerPoint comes with a number of pre-designed slide layouts that include placeholders for a list of bullets, or a graph chart, or clip art. Sometimes the slide you need to create is a diagram that does not fit into one of the pre-designed slide layouts. It might be a diagram that is a flow chart or a series of boxes.

A number of tools in PowerPoint can help you create, copy, and align objects on a slide. PowerPoint comes with a series of built-in shapes like arrows, lines, stars, etc. Additionally, from the Drawing toolbar you can add text boxes to your diagram.

HINT #1 - Sometimes you want to use shape and have text appear inside the shape. People spend countless hours in PowerPoint drawing the shape, creating a text box to hold the text, and positioning the text box over the shape. Then, in order to be able to move the shape and text around the slide, they "group" the two objects together. All of this tedious work is not necessary. Many shapes, like ovals, stars, banners, and flow chart symbols (basically any shape that is "solid") allow you to add text directly to the shape. Here's how you do it: draw the shape and with the shape still selected, begin typing the text. The text will appear in the middle of the shape and will be attached to the shape so that when you move the shape, the text moves too.

HINT #2 - When you need to add several of the same shapes to a PowerPoint slide, and you want them all to be the same size and have the same appearance (such as color or border thickness), here's what you do. Create one of the shapes, adjust the size and format its appearance. Once you have the shape exactly like you want it, select the shape and copy it to create duplicate shapes. Any easy way to do this is to press the CTRL key and drag. A new copy of the original shape will be attached to your mouse pointer. Position the copy where you need it. Repeat this CTRL & drag technique as many times as you need.

HINT #3 - Selecting objects is easy with these tips:

>>> When you need to randomly select multiple objects, use the Shift key. Click on the first object, press the Shift key and click on each additional object you need to select.

>>> To select all the objects in a given area of the slide, you can drag a "selection box" around the objects. Position the mouse pointer outside the objects. As you press the mouse button and drag, it appears as if you are drawing a box. Any object inside this box (called the selection box) when you release the mouse button will be selected.

>>> To select all the objects on the slide, choose Edit, Select All or press Ctrl+A.

HINT #4 - Use the Ctrl key to copy a slide object. Use Ctrl+Shift to copy an object and move it in a straight line.

HINT #5 - Grouping slide objects is a great way to move or resize multiple objects that you want to keep displayed together proportionally. Grouping is usually done when you anticipate you will reposition or resize the objects several times before finalizing their position on the slide. To group objects together, select the objects (using the techniques listed in HINT #3) and choose Draw from the Drawing toolbar. Then choose Group from the list of options. If the Drawing toolbar is not displayed, choose View, Toolbars and click Drawing.

HINT #6 - There are several ways to align and move objects on a PowerPoint slide:

>>> Gridlines. PowerPoint slides have a hidden set of gridlines which are used to align objects on your slides. Although you can't display the gridlines, you can turn them off or override them. To turn them off, choose Draw, Snap, To Grid from the Drawing toolbar. To override the gridlines and move an object more precisely, press the Alt key when you move an object.

>>> Rulers. Through the View menu you can display a horizontal and vertical ruler on the screen.

>>> Guides. Through the View menu you can display a set of straight lines, one horizontal and one vertical, called Guides. Initially, they display in the middle of your slide, but you can drag them to other positions on your slide. So if you want to align objects a few inches from the top right side of the slide, display the Rulers and the Guides. Then drag the guides to the exact horizontal and vertical positions you need. Any object you drag towards the guides, will now line up on the guides. You can use the Ctrl key to create additional guidelines. Position the mouse pointer on the guide you want to duplicate. Press the Ctrl key and drag to create the extra guide.


TIMING IN POWERPOINT

To check the timing, try this: Create a blank slide show with six slides (you can open the first slide and then choose Insert, Duplicate Slide five times). Go to the first slide and insert some ClipArt--some item that shows the slide change. Repeat this on the remaining five slides, putting a different picture on each one.

Now choose View, Slide Sorter. Right-click any slide and choose Slide Transition. Select the check box labeled Automatically After and enter 60 seconds. Click the arrow at the right side of the Sound list box and select a sound. Camera works well for this example slide show. Click Apply To All.

Next, right-click the first slide and choose Slide Transition. Select the checkbox labeled On Mouse Click and click Apply to apply the change to slide 1 only.

Choose Slide Show, View Show. The first slide will remain onscreen until you click the mouse button. There should be a minute between slides. You can use a clock or a watch with a second hand to time the slides. Just wait until the second hand is pointing to 12, then click the mouse button. You should hear the camera sound each minute thereafter for the remainder of the slide show.

We found the time off no more than a few seconds at the end of the entire slide show. The accuracy does very much depend on your computer, of course. We suggest that you stop any other programs, including screen savers, when you run a slide show.


GETTING PICTURES INTO POWERPOINT SLIDES

You have a CD-ROM of JPG pictures I would like to make into a slide show in PowerPoint. Is there a way you can insert all of the pictures at once instead of adding a slide and inserting pictures one at a time?

You can do this with a macro. The following is a simple macro that will import all the JPGs in a folder. You will have to modify it, since it doesn't have any code to set the photo's aspect ratio properly. If all your photos are the same size (ours were 640 by 480), you can simply set the height and width to match them and you'll have no problems with distortion.

To enter the code, run PowerPoint and open a blank slide. Press Alt-F11 to open the Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) editor. Choose Insert, Module and enter the following code. Make sure you substitute the correct paths for your system.

Sub GetPictures() Dim myPhotos, myPath As String

myPath = "d:\photos\" myPhotos = Dir(myPath + "*.jpg") Call PlacePicture(myPath, myPhotos)

Do Until myPhotos = "" myPhotos = Dir If myPhotos <> "" Then ActiveWindow.View.GotoSlide Index:=ActivePresentation.Slides.Add(Index:=1, Layout:=ppLayoutBlank).SlideIndex Call PlacePicture(myPath, myPhotos) End If Loop End Sub

Sub PlacePicture(myPath, myPhotos) ActiveWindow.Selection.SlideRange.Shapes.AddPicture(FileName:=myPath + myPhotos, LinkToFile:=msoFalse, SaveWithDocument:=msoTrue, Left:=72, Top:=78, Width:=640, Height:=480).Select ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignCenters, True ActiveWindow.Selection.ShapeRange.Align msoAlignMiddles, True End Sub

After you enter the code, press Ctrl-S to save your presentation. Next, press Ctrl-Q to get back to your slide, then press Alt-8 to open the Macro dialog box. Double-click your new macro to run it.

We have tested this macro with as many 250 pictures in the \Photos folder and had no problems.


USING TRANSPARENT LABELS IN POWERPOINT

If you would like to use some cool-looking labels in your PowerPoint slides, try semitransparent labels. To create a semitransparent label, click the Rectangle tool in the Drawing toolbar and draw a small rectangle. Double-click the rectangle to open the Format AutoShape dialog box. When the dialog box opens, click the Color And Lines tab. Under Fill, click the arrow at the right side of the Color list box. Select the color you'd like to use, then select the check box labeled Semitransparent. Click OK to close the dialog box and continue working on your label.

"Right-click your new label again and choose Add Text. Type the text you want to use, and you're all set to place your label anywhere on the slide.


ANIMATING A PASTED CHART IN POWERPOINT

You pasted an Excel chart into a PowerPoint slide. Now you would like to animate the elements of the chart, but find you can't. You don't want to rebuild the chart in PowerPoint, so is there a way to animate the chart you pasted in?"

You can ungroup the chart first, then animate the individual elements. To see how this works, paste a simple pie chart into a PowerPoint slide. With the chart still selected, click Draw, Ungroup. When you see a dialog box informing you that you might be doing a bad thing, click Yes. Click somewhere away from the chart to deselect all its components. Next, press Ctrl-A to select all the components, then press and hold Shift while you click the individual components you want to animate. Choose Draw, Group to group all the nonanimated portions of the chart. Next, choose Draw, Order, Send To Back to make your chart elements visible again. Now you can animate each pie slice. Right-click a slice, choose Custom Animation, and make your animation selections.


PowerPoint 97 Update: HTML Script Vulnerability

Posted: July 12, 2000

Summary

The PowerPoint® 97 HTML Script Vulnerability Update eliminates a security vulnerability in the PowerPoint 97 object model that could expose it to unsafe scripts when a user views a Web page or HTML e-mail message. Once the update is installed, PowerPoint 97 can only be scripted if the Initialize and script ActiveX controls marked unsafe option in Microsoft Internet Explorer is set to Enable.

Software Versions Updated

Update Availability

More Information
Please see the following references for more information related to this issue.

Obtaining Support on this Issue
If you are experiencing problems with this download or the Office Update site, please review our Support Page for assistance.


USING ANIMATION IN HTML POWERPOINT SLIDE SHOWS
You would like to create a slide show in PowerPoint to view in Microsoft Internet Explorer version 4.01. You know how to save the files as HTML, but how do you get the animation to work?

You need the Microsoft Animation Player. To download this file, go to http://support.microsoft.com/support/downloads/DP2039.ASP
Close Microsoft Internet Explorer and double-click the download file to install it. In PowerPoint, load the slide show you want to run in Explorer and choose File, Save As HTML. When the Save As HTML wizard opens, click Next. Since this is a new layout, make sure you've selected the New Layout button and click Next.

In the next page, select the Standard radio button and click Next. In this page, select the radio button labeled PowerPoint Animation and click Next. Now set your screen size and the width you want to use for your graphics. Click Next again. Click Next in this page (you don't really need anything here at this point). Click Next again. Select the button you want to use and click Next.

Now select the button placement and again click Next. Select a folder for your HTML files and click Next. Finally, you can click Finish to create your HTML presentation. You can now use the animation in your HTML slide show. However, we have found that not all animation files work as expected. You'll need to experiment with it.


NUMBERED TEXT IN POWERPOINT

How many times have you wished you could use a numbered list rather than using bullets in PowerPoint slides? There is a way to create numbered lists. Just go to http://officeupdate.microsoft.com/downloadDetails/bullets.htm
and download bullets.exe. After the file downloads, double-click its icon to install it in your \Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office folder. Now run PowerPoint and choose Tools, Add-Ins. When the Add-Ins dialog box opens, click Add New. Locate your Office folder and double-click the file named Numblts.ppa. This will install the Numbered Bullets toolbar. "Numbered Bullets will open as a floating toolbar when you run PowerPoint.


EDITING POINTS IN POWERPOINT
In some presentation programs, you can edit a ClipArt picture by dragging individual points with the mouse. You would find this feature useful in PowerPoint. Is there any way to work with individual lines in a PowerPoint ClipArt picture?

Yes, there is. Actually, PowerPoint calls it Edit Points, just as some of the other presentation programs do. The catch is that you won't see the command unless you elect to ungroup the ClipArt picture first. To see how this works, open a blank slide and choose Insert, Picture, ClipArt. Double-click a picture to insert it. Now select the picture and choose Draw, Ungroup. Click the slide somewhere away from the picture to deselect it. Next, click somewhere in the picture to select one of the ungrouped parts.

Choose Draw, Edit Points, and you can start working with the lines in the selected portion of the picture. If you select all the components of the picture and group it again, the Edit Points command no longer appears in the Draw menu.


Send a PowerPoint presentation on a floppy disk to someone who does not have the program.
How can he open the presentation?
Will the sound go with it?

This is a job for Pack And Go. Since you want to put the presentation on a floppy disk, place a formatted blank floppy disk into drive A:. Also put your Office installation disc into your CD-ROM drive--you'll need it later. If your presentation is very long, you should format two or three floppies. Pack And Go prompts you for a new disk when one fills up. Open your presentation in PowerPoint and choose File, Pack And Go. When the Pack And Go wizard opens, click Next. Since you want to save the current presentation, make sure the Active Presentation check box is selected and click Next again.

Now select the A: Drive radio button and click Next. Click Next again, then select the Viewer For Windows 95 Or NT radio button and click Next. Click Finish

Now to create your Pack And Go disk. When your friend receives the disk, he should put it into drive A: and double-click the Pngsetup.exe icon. This installs the slide show and the viewer on his computer. He can now play the show even though he doesn't have PowerPoint. The sound will also work. Note: When we rely on this method, we have had problems with losing the correct timing on single slides that loop continuously using custom animation.


To insert music that continues as the slide presentation runs. You know how to assign a music file to one slide, but you want it to continue uninterrupted throughout the entire presentationn.

You can start the sound on the first slide (or any slide) and have it continue through the remainder of the slide show. To see how this works, run PowerPoint and open a blank slide. Choose Insert, Picture, ClipArt and place a picture or two on the slide. Press Ctrl-M, then press Enter to create a new slide. Place some pictures or text on the new slide and create another new slide. Create at least five or six slides this way.

Now go back to the first slide and choose Insert, Movies And Sounds, Sound From File. Select the sound file you would like to use for your show and click OK. Use the mouse to move the sound icon out of the way. Right-click the Sound icon and choose Custom Animation. When the Custom Animation dialog box opens, click the Timing tab and then select the Animate and Automatically radio buttons. Leave the time set to 0 seconds and click the Play Settings tab.

Select the Continue Slide Show and After radio buttons. Set the number of slides to the maximum number of slides in your show. Next, click More Options. When the Play Options dialog box opens, select the check box labeled Loop Until Stopped and click OK. Back in Custom Animation, click OK to close the dialog box and apply your settings. The music should now play throughout the slide show. Choose Slide Show, View Show to start up your show.


How to Export a Word Outline

Instead of sending a PowerPoint presentation to Word, you can use an existing Word outline as the basis for a new presentation. PowerPoint automatically formats the outline based on the styles, paragraph indents and tabs you used in the original Word document. To export a Word outline into PowerPoint, save the Word document in rich text format (.rtf). To do this, open the document in Word, then choose Save As from the File menu. Click the Save As Type drop-down list arrow at the bottom of the window, choose Rich Text Format, then click Save. Now switch to PowerPoint, and choose Open from the File menu. Click the Files Of Type drop-down list arrow, then choose All Files from the list. Find your Word file, and double-click it to open it within PowerPoint. Then, modify and save the new presentation just as you would any other.


Save PowerPoint Slide Show Format

To maintain the integrity of your presentation, and to prevent others with whom you share it from discovering how you achieved certain tricks, save your presentation in PowerPoint Show format. Choose Save As from the File menu, then select PowerPoint Show (PPS) from the File Type list. When others open the presentation, it will appear in slide show format, with all menus and tools hidden.


Use AutoLayouts to Create Uniform Designs

One way to maintain design cohesiveness in your presentations is to use PowerPoint's pre-set slide layouts. The 24 AutoLayouts include placeholders, or pre-designed areas, to accept text or graphics. Using AutoLayouts helps you to create new slides quickly, but also ensures that your slides are similar in design. To choose the slide layout for a new slide, click the New Slide button to display the New Slide dialog box. Double-click the AutoLayout style that you want for your new slide. You can also change the slide layout for an existing slide, although some of the existing elements might not display as you expect. Display the slide you want to modify and then click Format, Slide Layout. In the Slide Layout dialog box, double-click the Auto Layout you want. Finally, you can use Slide Masters to place an element, such as your corporate logo, on all of your slides. To do this, choose View, Master, Slide Master. Make revisions to the Master slide, such as inserting pictures or changing bullet style, and when you're finished, click the Normal (or Slide) view button. The changes will appear on all of the slides.


POWERPOINT PRESENTATION FILE TYPES
+DON'T OPEN A PPS FILE
I had several people write to me in the past week asking about PowerPoint .PPS and .PPT files. It's an interesting topic - and one that hasn't changed from PowerPoint 97 to PowerPoint 2000 to PowerPoint 2002 (the version in Office XP).

When you save a PowerPoint presentation (File | Save or File | Save As), PowerPoint assumes you want to save your presentation as a PPT file: that's a plain, old-fashioned PowerPoint file, one that you can edit again and again (and again and again). Down at the bottom of the Save dialog box, though, you can scroll down the "Save As Type" list and choose something called "PowerPoint Show." That's the PPS file.

In fact, there's very little difference between a PPT file (what the Save As Type box calls a "Presentation") and a PPS file ("PowerPoint Show"). The main difference is what Windows does when you double-click on the file. If you double-click on a PPT file, PowerPoint comes up with the presentation loaded, ready for you to edit. If you double-click on a PPS file, the presentation gets run directly: PowerPoint never raises its ugly head. (Er, beautiful head. Whatever.)

If you fire up PowerPoint and click File | Open, you're given a list of both PPT and PPS files - you can open and edit either, no sweat. In PowerPoint 2002, both PPT and PPS files appear in the New Presentation task pane. And once you've opened either kind of file, the entire array of PowerPoint options are available to you. PPS isn't a second-class citizen: it can do anything a PPT file can do.

But there's a little gotcha waiting in the wings. Read on.

DON'T OPEN A PPS FILE
Here's the problem. Say you have a presentation called BootCamp.PPT. You've saved a copy of it as BootCamp.PPS, so you can double-click on the file and have it run immediately. But the two files aren't synched: if you make changes to BootCamp.PPS, the changes aren't reflected in BootCamp.PPT - and vice-versa. Two different versions of the same file always spells trouble.

There's a little rule of thumb I've developed over the years. School of hard knocks and all that. It goes like this:

Don't Open A PPS File

When you bring up PowerPoint and open a file from the Open dialog box (or PowerPoint 2002's task pane), skip over the PPS's. Avoid them like the plague. That way, you can be sure that you're always working on the latest version of your presentation - no sweat.

Once in a very, very blue moon you'll discover that you've lost the PPT file, and have no choice but to work with a PPS file. When that happens, I'll open the PPS file, but immediately click File | Save As, choose Presentation from the "Save As Type" box, and save the presentation as a PPT file. That way there's no chance of getting my versions shifted around.


POWERPOINT TEMPLATES
I've seen a resurgence in interest about PowerPoint lately, and I wanted to follow up.

PowerPoint has something called a "template" - actually, there are four different things that PowerPoint calls "templates" - but a PowerPoint template isn't anything at all like a Word template, or an Excel template. In fact, PowerPoint itself isn't consistent in how it defines "Design template", "Presentation design", "Content template" and "Presentation template".

If you're trying to make heads from tails out of PowerPoint's, uh, creative terminology, There's a reason why you've been scratching your head at all the different terms floating around. No, you aren't crazy.

PowerPoint gives you three (or four) different ways to create new, "blank" presentations:

You might think that using any of these methods would create a, uh, new, blank presentation. But they don't. In fact, if you create a new presentation in any of these ways, PowerPoint 97 and 2000 first look to see if you have a file called

Blank Presentation.pot

in your Office templates folder (typically c:\Documents and Settings\Username\Application Data\Microsoft\Templates). PowerPoint 2002 looks in the same place, for a file called

Blank.pot

No, I don't make this stuff up. The name of the "default template" changed in PowerPoint 2002.

(Note: the \Application Data folder may be hidden on your system. To make sure Windows shows it to you, go into Windows Explorer by double-clicking on My Documents, then click Tools | Options | View and check the box marked Show Hidden Files and Folders. In WinXP, click Start | My Documents | Tools | Folder Options and check the box.)

CREATING A NEW BLANK PRESENTATION
It's easy to create a "default template" for all of your new presentations. Here's how:

That's all it takes. From that point on, whenever you create a new "blank" presentation, PowerPoint will start out with the presentation you've created.


Run a Song Through an Entire Large Slide Show 

Reader AT writes: I have WINDOWS 98-with-OFFICE 97

How I can add music (a song) in a complete slide show (about 50 o 55 slides) I want to play a song during mi presentation, I don't want a different song in each slide.....Please, can you help me ?

Power Point 97 and Power Point 2000 do pretty much the same thing only slightly different. There, wasn't that as clear as mud?

In PP 2000:

  1. Choose Insert, Movies and Sounds
  2. Click Sound From Gallery (or Sound From File or Play CD Audio Track or Record Sound).
In PowerPoint 97:
You can use WAV, MID, and RMI sound files (though it can play MP3 sounds that have been added using later versions of PowerPoint.) If you need to convert your sound file to one of the formats that PPT 97 will recognize, check out some of the converter's we have listed on Bohunky0's Freeware From A-Z under multimedia. Click here for some of our freeware and other alternatives in ripping.

PowerPoint 2000 and up can use WAV, MP3, MID, RMI, AIF, AIFC, AU, WMA, and AFS.

Insert the sound.

  1. If you don't want the sound icon to appear in the slide show, drag it just off the slide.
  2. Right-click the sound's icon and pick Custom Animation from the popup menu.
  3. Click the Multimedia Settings tab and make certain that the object is selected.
  4. Click to put a checkmark next to Play using animation order.
  5. Click to select Continue slide show. This tells PowerPoint NOT to stop playing the sound when you move to the next slide.
  6. Under Stop Playing, click After and dial in the number of slides you'd like the sound to play through. If you want the sound to continue through the end of the presentation, dial in a really big number.
That's all there is to it. Your sound will now continue after you leave the slide on which you placed it.  
 
 NOTES:
And if you use PowerPoint 20002/XP
NOTES ADDITIONAL:
If you're having difficulty playing more than one CD audio track in a PPT 2002/XP presentation, it's because the settings need to be a little different than what you'd expect in the custom animation pane Effects tab.

Free Audio converter's:

If you have a CD format and you have Microsoft Media Player, you should, depending on which version you have, be able to Rip the CD format to an MP3 format.

Others from our Freeware pages include

Retro Powerpoint
I can't imagine why you'd like your Powerpoint 2003 presentations to look like they were made last century - perhaps there's some retro fad out there?

Anyway, all the 'old' POT templates from Powerpoint 4 and later are still available in three downloads from Microsoft.

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=3a8b90ac-2bcb-4fec-a8b4-bfbd509baefb&displaylang=en

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=e903488f-0f1d-4cae-aa2f-6de7afc8db59&displaylang=en

and

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=47cedf97-b910-4a17-96c8-18c155492a9a&displaylang=en__

Pictures With Powerpoint


Adding a few pictures or images to your Powerpoint presentation is quite simple.  There are many ways to do it, the official way and others.

You can insert images from many common formats including the usual suspects - GIF, JPG and TIFF.  The only format some people might want are the digital camera RAW formats - if you have such a photo you should convert it to JPG then use it in Powerpoint.

And there's a common problem when you use large images with Powerpoint that I'll detail below to save (no pun intended) you finding out the hard way.


Inserting Pictures - The Official Method

The least confusing way to insert a picture is to choose a Slide Layout first - in Powerpoint 2003 there's a Slide Layout task pane for easy selection.  The Layouts give you a structure for the slide with positions for images, text and titles.

Move down to the section headed 'Content Layouts' if you want the picture to be on the slide by itself or 'Text and Content Layouts' for a mix of text and image on the same page.  There's all manner of options - the areas with small logos (grid, head, bar chart and circle) mean a place for images, graphs etc.  The bullet list means a text area.  The gray bar at the top means the title bar.

Click on a slide layout and the current slide will change to that layout.

Now you can insert a picture.  Click on one of the logos in the middle of the image area - in this case the 'Insert Picture' icon.  Choose the image you want from the usual file selection dialog.

The image will be resized to fit in the image layout area while still retaining the image ratios of the original image.

Once inserted, you're not limited to the layout area.  There are handles around the image to let you resize, stretch or rotate the image.

Most commonly I use this to take the image right up to the edge of the slide so that the picture can be as large as possible.  I find the Microsoft supplied areas too small with too much screen space devoted to margins - but that's a personal choice - you're not obliged to accept my style or Microsoft's.

You can move an image by clicking and dragging it around the slide.  Note that you can drag it over other areas and obscure anything in them.

Just for once the official method is probably the best since it gives you layout options to work from and automatically resizes the image to the slide area.  But there is the Q & D approach.

The Quick And Dirty Method
You can bypass all the slide layout options and just drop an image onto the slide - that works fine in demonstrations but can be confusing in the real world.

On any slide you can choose Insert | Picture | from file ... and it'll appear on the slide.

Most digital camera images are much larger than a slide screen so chances are the insert image will more than fill the slide space and spill over the edges in a big way.  Naturally this depends on the size of your digital camera images - but most images in the camera default Fine mode will be larger than a slide.

To reduce the slide to a workable size right-click on the image and choose Format Picture:

1. on the Size tab adjust the scale to a small ratio (I choose 20% for starters).
    a. Make sure the Lock Aspect Ratio check box is ON.
    b. Relative to original picture size should also be ON.
2. on the Position tab change the location of the picture
    a. Horizontal to 0 and Center
    b. Vertical to 0 and Center.

If you change the size and not the position the image will be resized but likely positioned off the edge of the slide.  You'll have to use the window scroll bars to find the image - usually hiding somewhere in the top left.

Once you have the image on the screen in a workable size you can see all the handles and easily re-position it to exactly the size and position you want on the screen.

Of Size And Saving - A Warning
So now you've added an image or two, and are happy with your work, you hit the Save button.  Powerpoint starts to save (you can see this in the status bar) then stops and finally you see the dreaded 'Not responding' in the title bar.

You've struck a common problem with Powerpoint - the program doesn't like saving presentations with large images, despite assurances to the contrary. There's no warning about this, most people find out the hard way. 


It has become more of a problem as digital cameras become more popular and the resolution of cameras increases.   These days a digital image of 3MB in JPEG format is not too unusual.

There's two options for avoiding this problem:

1. Compress the image before importing into Powerpoint.  The Office Picture Manager can do this for you - I choose the 'Documents' option to give a smaller image but still with sufficient quality for screen display.

2. Compress the image after inserting into the presentation.  Right-click on the image, choose Format Picture | Picture tab | Compress.  I choose the larger Print resolution option rather than the Web/screen option just because I want to make sure the images still look good on the screen.

    a. There is an option to compress all images in the presentation or just the selected one.


Each option has drawbacks.  With the first method you run the risk of accidentally saving over your original image with a lower resolution version.  The second options there’s the chance that you’ll insert the image then forget to compress it before trying to save.

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