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| Go back to the Index Page | Bo's Browser Wars | MSIE News Front | Updated 12/06/04 |

Welcome to Bohunky0's MSIE Help & How To Page VI

Page Index
Got a problem you can't find on these pages? Click here and tell me about it

  1. Problems Changing default HTM Icon
  2. Can not enable coolies to view Hotmail account.
  3. Internet Explorer or Outlook Express Quits Unexpectedly with an Error in Mshtml.dll
  4. Recovering Deleted Emails and Compacting your folders, the real delete
  5. How to stop those annoying popups in MSIE
  6. Computer wants to phone home at startup
  7. Hijacked Internet Search Engine
  8. Internet Explorer keeps shutting down unexpectedly
  9. Internet Explorer will not close when shutting it down
    IExplore.exe is still running in the Processes Tab of Task Manager
  10. Outlook Express Print script error
  11. Open MSIE Maximized
  12. Phishing and ways to identify a fake site
  13. More coming:


Phishing and ways to identify a fake site

We have talked, adnasume, about the problems of security and the new nasty, "Phishing". Phishing is when an email or website tricks you into divulging sensitive personal information. There is a way, in MSIE, Firefox, Mozilla, and Netscape to see what the real site url is. Try this:

  1. In MSIE type the following line into the addressbar of a site you are visiting:

    javascript:alert("The real URL of this site is: " + location.protocol + "//" + location.hostname + "/");
  2. Click go or hit the enter key. MSIE will identify the real address. For example, if you set this Java code in the address bar of this page, your output will be:

    The real url of this site is http://www.uninets.net
  3. There will be no fooling you if you are armed with this little Java script.

You can also copy the following JScript code and paste it in the Address bar for a more verbose description of the Web site URL:

javascript:alert("The actual URL is: " + location.protocol + "//" + location.hostname + "/" + "\nThe address URL is: " + location.href + "\n" + "If the server names do not match, this may be a spoof.");

Compare the actual URL with the URL in the Address bar. If they do not match, the Web site is likely misrepresenting itself. In this case, you may want to leave the site by typing a new URL or by exiting Internet Explorer.

In this example we have set the address for this site with characters that might match a spoofed site to show you how it might work. If you copy and paste the above JavaScript into the address bar it will return an address of:

http://www.uninets.net/~blaisdel/IE_6.html#Phishing%20and%20ways%20to%20identify%20a%20fake%20site

Note all of the strange characters for this site. If this were a real spoofed site, you would want to avoided it like the plague.

Some other methods:

To help identify the URL for a link
To help identify the URL for a link in Internet Explorer:

1. Right-click the link, and then click Copy Shortcut.
2. Click Start, and then click Run.
3. Type notepad, and then click OK.
4. On the Edit menu in Notepad, click Paste.

This lets you see the full URL for any hyperlink and lets you examine the address that Internet Explorer will use. Below are some of the characters that may appear in a URL which could lead to a spoofed Web site:

* %00
* %01
* @

Compare the History Bar with the URL on page:

In the scenarios that Microsoft has tested, you can also use the History Explorer Bar in Internet Explorer to help identify the URL of a Web page. On the View menu, point to Explorer Bar, and then click History. Compare the URL in the Address bar with the URL that appears in the History bar. If they do not match, the Web site is likely misrepresenting itself and you may want to leave the site by typing a new URL or exiting Internet Explorer.

Additional information
Consider taking the following actions to help increase your Internet security.

Note These actions do not help you to identify a deceptive (spoofed) Web site or URL. However, they restrict e-mail messages and Web sites in the Internet zone from running scripts, ActiveX Controls, and other potentially damaging content.

* Use your Web content zones to help prevent Web sites that are in the Internet zone from running scripts, running ActiveX Controls, or running other damaging content on your computer. First, set your Internet zone security level to High in Internet Explorer. To do so, follow these steps:

1. On the Tools menu, click Internet Options.
2. Click the Security tab, click Internet, and then click Default level.
3. Move the slider to High, and then click OK.
Next, add the URLs for Web sites that you trust to the Trusted Sites zone. To do so, follow these steps:
1. On the Tools menu, click Internet Options.
2. Click the Security tab.
3. Click Trusted sites.
4. Click Sites.
5. If the sites that you want to add do not require server verification, click to clear the Require server verification (https:) for all sites in this zone check box.
6. Type the address of the Web site you want to add to the Trusted sites list.
7. Click Add.
8. Repeat steps 6 and 7 for each Web site that you want to add.
9. Click OK two times. 

Read E-mail Messages in Plain Text.

For Outlook 2002 and Outlook 2003:

307594 OL2002: Users Can Read Nonsecure E-mail as Plain Text
831607 How to View All E-Mail Messages in Plain Text Format in Outlook 2003

For Outlook Express 6:

291387 OLEXP: Using Virus Protection Features in Outlook Express 6

By reading e-mail in plain text, you can see the full URL of any hyperlink and examine the address that Internet Explorer will use. The following are some of the characters that may appear in a URL which could lead to a spoofed Web site:

* %00
* %01
* @

# For example, a URL of the following form will open http://example.com, but the URL that appears in the Address bar of Internet Explorer may show http://www.wingtiptoys.com:

http://www.wingtiptoys.com%01@example.com

For more information about Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), visit the following Word Wide Web Consortium Web site:

See also this Microsoft article:
How to Tell If a Microsoft Security-Related Message Is Genuine


Open MSIE Maximized

Internet Explorer launches minimized. There is no easy way to force MSIE to launch maximized. However, there are ways to initiate the browser in a larger minimized window. Here is how:

Try this:

  1. Launch MSIE
  2. Hover the cursor over the lower left-hand corner of the minimized browser until it turns to a double arrow head.
  3. Drag the browser window to expand it to a point that is near a maximized position.
  4. Once you have it where you want it, hold down on the Ctrl key and using the mouse, click File | Close.
  5. The next time you launch MSIE, it will remember the position and size of the window and from now on, it will launch in a near maximized form. or to the size you had dragged it to.

This tip requires that you use the System Registry Editor. For more on the Registry Editor, please see Bo's Tweaky Clean Windows. Before making any system file edits be sure you know how to recover from a disaster and read the warning below:

WARNING: Using Registry Editor incorrectly can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Blaisdell's Little Corner of the Web, Bohunky0, nor any of it's affiliates can guarantee that problems resulting from the incorrect use of Registry Editor can be solved. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.

For information about how to edit the registry, view the "Changing Keys and Values" Help topic in Registry Editor (Regedit.exe) or the "Add and Delete Information in the Registry" and "Edit Registry Data" Help topics in Regedt32.exe. Note that you should back up the registry before you edit it. If you are running Windows NT or Windows 2000, you should also update your Emergency Repair Disk (ERD).

If MSIE opens minimized to the taskbar or offscreen:

Internet Explorer Windows open 'off screen' or tiny or minimised to the taskbar.  The window will not move if off-screen, and if resized by dragging or using the window buttons, does not keep the size set.
This trick should work.

Remove any 'Auto-hide' option for the taskbar and while the window is maximized, increase the height of the taskbar from one row to two. Allow the maximized window to reset itself to fit into the new area allowed by the taller taskbar.  Now return the taskbar to its normal single row. This is to try to make Windows re-calculate the window size and boundaries.

If this didn't solve the problem, this trick should work.

  1. Close any open MSIE browser window
  2. Click Start | Run (Windows  Key + R)| and type Regedit
    See
    What's the key for?
  3. Click Okay
  4. The system Registry Editor opens in an Explorer type window.
  5. Remove these registry key values which are most likely corrupted:
  6. Reboot the system

Windows will recalculate the new windows area and reset these registry values to the default.

If still a no go, try doing this regedit:

  1. Close any open MSIE browser window
  2. Click Start | Run (Windows  Key + R)| and type Regedit
    See What's the key for?
  3. Click Okay
  4. The system Registry Editor opens in an Explorer type window.
  5. Locate the below key
    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Document Windows.
  6. Now modify the Maximized key  from no to yes in the right-hand pane.
  7. Click File | Exit to close the Registry Editor
  8. Reboot the system
  9. Start MSIE, it should now start Maximized.

Another method:

1) Right click on the IE icon on your Task bar, choose properties, where it says 'run' = Maximised.
2) Open two instances of the IE window, enlarge each. Use File/Close on each and then use the icon to open.
3) Open two instances of the IE window - enlarge them and whilst holding down the 'shift' key, close each one in turn.


Outlook Express Print script error

Question:
I keep getting this message when I try to print anything with MSIE Outlook Express" I keep getting a IE Script Error popup when I try to print a copy of a OE message, and when you say YES to "Do you want to continue running scripts on this page" it takes three clicks,

The Error reads.

Line:  1334
Char:  1
Error: invalid argument
Code:  0

Any Ideas on how to stop this or at least a work a round? - Creg

Answer: Sure Creg, try this:

  1. Click Start | Run or Windows Key +R | and type:

    Regsvr32 vbscript.dll
  2. Click okay
  3. Then; Click Start | Run or Windows Key +R | and type:

    Regsvr32 jscript.dll
  4. Click okay

This should fix it for you.

In our same thing only different department; we have had these questions and we list here the MSKB articles to resolve them.

Script_errors involving preview.dlg when printing

Cannot print from Internet Explorer

http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q293/1/76.ASP

 

Err Msg: Printing Error: The Printer Cannot Be Found [Q303360]
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q303/3/60.asp

 

Error Message When You Attempt to Print a Web Page: An Error Has Occurred in the Script on This Page [Q303486]
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;q303486


Internet Explorer will not close when shutting it down
IExplore.exe is still running in the Processes Tab of Task Manager

Question:
Okay Bo, I don’t normally contact sites like yours for advice but I’m at the end of the rope with nothing left underneath me.

I’m running XPpro, me, 98, 2000.  Plus still have some NT stuff.  I have a lock up issue with IE.  It does not make any difference which operating system I’m running.  Here’s the scenario.

Log on and go to an intranet site.

Download a file

Close the download acceptance box.

Break the internet connection without closing IE.

Close IE.  IE is cleared from the desktop view.

When reviewing the task manager processing tab, I still see Iexplore running.  The CPU consumption is 99%. 

Restarting and running IE again will place another copy or IE in the Processes tab.  Most program will still run but slowly.  The only way to remove the first running incident of IExplore is to end the process or restart the system.

When monitoring the IE process I tested the events until I found the specific issue above.  As soon as I close or break the internet connection without closing IE first the CPU usage of IE will jump to 99%

Question.

Do you know of any setting that will cause this issue?  If so can you please offer it to me.

Also note that it occurs if on a dial up modem, broadband, satellite or whatever.  IE just does not close itself down. 
Cliff

Possible Answers:
This is a very common problem Cliff, in fact, I have had it myself.
I list, below, in no particular order, the fixes that have worked for other folks. Will they work for you? Doubtful, that all instances of MSIE on different partitions on different OS's, thingy; remember?

There may be several problems all rolled into one.
What I find most curious is that it is happening to all of your versions of MSIE. I assume that you have installed MSIE on each individual OS and through a LAN using shared folders. In this case, to be frank, (I'm going to be Frank today, tomorrow I'll be Bo) I really do not have a tried and true fix, If it were just one install, I'd suggest that uninstalling then re-installing would save a lot of headaches. But, as this, apparently, is not the case....never mind!

Before jumping headlong into a fix which may, or may not work:

Check out the many posts on Microsoft's newsgroup, search for "iexplore.exe" -

(http://support.microsoft.com/newsgroups - Internet Technologies - Internet Explorer 6.0 - Browser)

The Registry:
If some piece of software or other has made a change to the system registry, by which the browser is being launched in a separate process, this could cause this type of problem. Keeping MSIE in a single process will close all instances of the browser if there is a problem with one. While not doing this sounds like a good idea on the surface, the problem you describe may be part of the end result.

To see if this vital registry key had been altered, do the following:
NOTE: Cliff said that this option worked for him.
If you are unfarmilliar with the system registry, please see
Bo's Tweaky Clean Windows.

  1. Hit Windows Key + R to bring up the run dialog
  2. Type
    REGEDIT
    For Windows 9.x and XP or
    REGEDIT32
    for Windows NT or W2K
  3. Navigate to the key:
    [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer]
  4. Look for a string value in the right hand pane of:
    "BrowseNewProcess"
  5. If it exists, change the property sheet to "No" rather than "Yes"
  6. Close all instances of MSIE even if you need to do it through the processes tab in TM.
  7. Close RegEdit
  8. Open one instance of MSIE and do a little surfing. Then try to close it. If the string value described above was there, then this should fix the problem.

In the same key as above, also look for the string value of "CleanShutdown" in the right hand pane and change it's value to "1" to enable it.

Clicking AVI Files on explorer causing 100% CPU Usage [Windows XP]

Well windows seem to have a REALLY big problem when it comes to reading AVI files. It seems that when you click on an AVI file in explorer, it'll try to read the entire AVI file to determine the width,height, etc. of the AVI file (this is displayed in the Properties window). Now the problem with Windows is that if you have a broken/not fully downloaded AVI file that doesn't contain this info, Windows will scan the entire AVI file trying to figure out all these properties which in the process will probably cause 100% CPU usage and heavy memory usage.

To solve this problem all you have to do is the following:

1. Open up regedit
2. Goto HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\SystemFileAssociations\.avi\shellex\PropertyHandler
3. Delete the "Default" value which should be "{87D62D94-71B3-4b9a-9489-5FE6850DC73E}"

Voila! Please note that this will no longer provide you with the windows properties displaying the AVI file information such as width, height, bitrate etc. But its a small price to pay for saving you resources.

First:

Second:
In these instances it can be, and often is, a result of a corrupted cache file and/or a cache that is just to small. This is the basic stuff we need to get out of the way first.

  1. Open MSIE
  2. Click on Tools | Internet Options
  3. Select the General tab
  4. Click the delete files button
  5. Once finished, click on the Settings button and increase your disk cache by 20 megabytes. This is accomplished by either moving the slider to the right slightly or typing in megabytes the increase in disk cache size. If it is now at 80 MB make it 100MB and so on.

Third:
Download and run HiJack This. Hihjack this is a diagnostic program which searches for anomalies in MSIE and reports those anomalies. Be careful however, as some systems report a failure and those failures are expected. Never delete anything in HiJack This unless you are sure it is the cause of your problems.

Sometimes when a button or other object is added to, lets say the navigation bar in MSIE, if they are written poorly, will cause MSIE to halt without closing because the close command for the bar entry is missing, or is not where Windows expects to find it. Try disabling some of the add-on navigation bars. Here is how:

  1. In MSIE click View | Toolbars
  2. Uncheck any items which are not MSIE's original equipment.
  3. Test your browser after shutting it down and restarting it. If the problem is gone, one of the browser add-on buttons is not functioning.

Fourth:
Sounds to me like you have IEXPLORE not fully exiting,
even if the IE window gets closed. Think back, please.

Does this happen after you have had IE open, but then close it normally?
Do some practice runs if you need to. The question is--are these due to your closing IE but it isn't completely unloading?
Or do these appear spontaneously, even if you have not opened IE in this session?

Last question is, assuming that these are left over from an instance of IE not closing, is there any common denominator to the pages you have browsed? Boiled down, here are the possible scenarios:

1. You open IE and, due to a problem in the program itself, it doesn't
completely unload when you close it.

2. You open IE and due to code in certain pages, the browser session is
kept open, even though you close the window.

3. Something is surreptitiously launching an IE session without a
window.

In reality, if it turns out to be either of the last two, I would suspect a very small window is being launched--1 pixel by 1 pixel. Regardless, this indicates very malicious activity. Either a remote site trying and/or succeeding in remaining active on your machine without you knowing it, or a Trojan virus launching, either one having the goal of monitoring your
activities, stealing data, whatever, and sending it to the mother ship.

However, my guess is that it is cause #1, and a Repair or reinstallation of IE is called for. IE is "TSR--Terminate(d) and Stay(ing) Resident. No surprise that such behavior would go hand-in-hand with a "Resources leak", which is the symptom you report.

Fifth:
Some times a corrupted or incomplete Host file will cause all manner of problems.

This file contains the mappings of IP addresses to host names. Each entry should be kept on an individual line. The IP address should be placed in the first column followed by the corresponding host name. The IP address and the host name should be separated by at least one space.

Additionally, comments (such as these) may be inserted on individual lines or following the machine name denoted by a '#' symbol.

For example:
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
#      102.54.94.97     rhino.acme.com           # source server
#       38.25.63.10     x.acme.com               # x client host

127.0.0.1       localhost

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

host priority

For Network Load Balancing, a host's precedence for handling default network traffic for TCP and UDP ports. It is used if a host within the cluster goes offline, and it determines which host within the cluster will assume responsibility for the traffic previously handled by the offline host.

The Host File:

If the host file is corrupted or is in some other way not functioning, use these steps to determine its location and rename it. Reboot and Windows will make a new one. As you have multiple boots, and if you are not using an area LAN, you may need to follow these steps on each of the operating systems.

 1. Double-click My Computer, Click Tools and Click Folder Options.
2. Click View and click "Show hidden files and folders".
3. Click Apply and click OK.
4. Click Start menu, click Search, and click All files and folders.
5. Type "hosts" (without the quotation marks) under the "All or part of the file name"
6. Click Search.
7. After the Hosts.txt file is found, please rename it to old.txt. (Not to worry. A new one will be created the next time you log on).


Internet Explorer keeps shutting down unexpectedly

Question: Sometimes when browsing with Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0, one winow will have a problem and the only way to fix it is to close all windows. They close by themselves. Is there any way around this? - Jessie

Answer: Sure Jessie, but first, take a look at Bo's Tweaky Clean Windows to learn how to backup and restore the system registry. Yup, that is right, we need to do a regiatry edit. Here is what to do:

Open registry (by going to START | RUN (Or hit the Windows Key + R) and entering regedit by typing REGEDIT in the run box or REGEDIT32 for Windows NT/2000 and navigate to

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer]

and add a new string by the name of "BrowseNewProcess" and set its value to "yes". That's all. Doing this would open your Internet Explorer Browser in a separate process area of its own, and this would not shut down just because there was a problem with another instance of Internet Explorer.

Same thing only different department:
Open Registry by going to START | RUN and entering REGEDIT and Navigate to [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanServer\Parameters]
and look for autodisconnect parameter. Change its value to whatever You want (in minutes)


Hijacked Internet Search Engine
Go directly to the possible answer

Reader Jimer writes:

My default browser is set as Google.com. However, when it tries to go there it is redirected to RoyalSearch.net. Apparently this is a problem encountered by others because there is a link at the bottom of their page which reads "How do I remove RoyalSearch.net as my default search engine...read this". Clicking on this link takes me to http://www.google.com/homepage.html In case it doesn't take you there this is what that page says: Last time we recieve many letters like: "Can you please explain to me why your website keeps coming up on my computer, even though i change the settings, so it wont keep poping up. I do not want your website up on my computer, please respond, to let me know how to get rid of your site...." ....We I go to my computer, then internet options and try to load the home page I want to use, I can do that. The next time turn I re-boot my computer, it defaults back to your search engine. I have found a link in my internet temp. files to your search engine and deleted that and reset my home page via control panel, internet options etc. and reset my home page. We I turn my computer off and re-boot again, I'm back to your search engine. What else do I need to do to fix this? Where is the embedded link?...

Unfortunately, we don't know how to solve your problem. This is not the first complaint on this matter.Our Search Engine is advertised by hundreds of webmasters, and we cannot control everyone. If the url of our SE was non-authorized set on your pc, please report us the url of the page where it happened. support@royalsearch.net <mailto:support@royalsearch.net?subject=Report cheater Usage of harmful software for advertising our SE is prohibited(Terms and Conditions 4.1.5) The webmaster, which advertised our SE with such software would be deleted from our base with no payouts. Report your problem with more details and we will try to help you. support@royalsearch.net <mailto:support@royalsearch.net?subject=Report cheater Best Regards.

to remove this, try to use this freeware soft - HijackThis <http://www.spywareinfo.com/~merijn/ or search in registry for suspicious .exe, .js, .hta, .vbs here: Start-Run-regedit HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run or (and) HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run

I tried HijackThis afer downloading from the site, but it did not correct the problem. Can you help?


Suggestion 1:

Based on my experience,  there may be an Internet Explorer search assistance program installed on your computer. Please go to Add/Remove programs to see if there is such a program. If so, please uninstall the program.

Suggestion 2:

If the problem still occurs, please try the following steps.

1. Double-click My Computer, Click Tools and Click Folder Options.
2. Click View and click "Show hidden files and folders".
3. Click Apply and click OK.
4. Click Start menu, click Search, and click All files and folders.
5. Type "hosts" (without the quotation marks) under the "All or part of the file name"
6. Click Search.
7. After the Hosts.txt file is found, please rename it to old.txt.

Suggestion 3:

If the problem still occurs, please change the AutoSearch search page back to the default search page:

1. Quit Internet Explorer.
2. Click Start, click Run, type Regedit, and click OK.
3. Find the key below:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\SearchUrl

Set the Default value to a data value of

"http://www.google.com?p=%s" (without the quotation marks) NOTE: This should set the value back to Google.

In Windows XP:
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\SearchUrl

  1. Right click on SearchUrl and choose: New | Key
  2. Rename the new key value, Google
  3. In the right hand pane, right click and choose:
    New String Value
  4. Name the new value, Default
    1. Create another string value
    2. Delete the string value of New value #1 and then choose rename and leave blank
      1. Double click the blank entry and use for a value, "+" without the quotes
  5. Create another string value
    1. Name this value as, %.
    2. Give this value one of  %25
  6. Create another string value
    1. Name this value as, &.
    2. Give this value one of  %26
  7. Create another string value
    1. Name this value as, +.
    2. Give this value one of  %28
  8. If there are any other search engines in the right hand pane, that you do not want, delete them after backing up the registry string. (Click File | Export and choose the selected branch. Give the export a name, like Oldsearch and click save to a folder of your choosing. Go t that location in Windows Explorer. There should now be a file called Oldsearch.reg.
    Do the same for each key value you need to delete).
  9. Quit Registry Editor, and then start Internet Explorer.

Computer wants to phone home at startup

Question: I have noticed lately that when I start Windows the Internet connection dialog opens. I did not do anything, that I know of, to cause this. How do I stop it? - Creg

Answer: There are many things which can cause this sort of thing. The first thing to consider is the addition of any connection intensive software recently which may have changed your settings to enable the PHP or "Phone Home Phenomenon". If you do not have a resident alien disguised as ET, then you may want to get rid of them or at least halt them.

First:
Update your antivirus, disable your screen saver and scan for All Files. DUN starting up at odd times is a bug but not a bad one. Just click Cancel. The below are other remedies for stronger application trying to startup DUN wrongfully like Trojan Horses. Get free Zone Alarm personal firewall anti-hacker countermeasure from http://www.zonelabs.com. The rule with ZA is, 'Don't let anything out you don't know what it is'.

Second:
Clean out your Startup folder - Start | Programs (All Programs in Win XP) | Startup. Right click each item in turn and choose delete for items you aren't sure of. If unsure, and you'd rather not delete them, create a folder on the Startup tree called, Disabled Startup Items. Rather then delete them, simply move them to this folder. Then if you discover that they are something you really needed, just copy them back. They will startup the next time you start Windows. This will also boost load times as Windows has one or more less things to run at startup. You'd be amazed at the amount of programs and services that are actually running in the background robbing your system of vital resources.

Many times systems that are needed and reside in the system tray have options or preference settings which tells the program to load at startup or, "When Windows starts". It is always best to disable any startup items within the running program.

For what can be removed at startup, visit this site: WHAT'S RUNNING AT STARTUP?

Third:
The Microsoft Configuration Utility:
If you have read any of these how to articles you will remember that this tool can help a lot in troubleshooting certain issues germane to your computing experience. Well, we are going to take another look at it now.

Start the tool by doing the following:

  1. Click Start | Run or, for you who do not mouse around but prefer shortcuts Windows Key + R
  2. Type:
    MSCONFIG
  3. Hit the enter key or click okay
  4. Click on the Startup Tab
  5. Go down through the list and anything that may cause a connection at startup, simply remove the check mark from the box.
  6. Click Apply
  7. Click Okay
  8. MsConfig is going to tell you that you need to restart. You must do this to lock the changes into the system registry. If you choose to cancel, no changes will take place.
  9. When Windows restarts you will be confronted with a dialog informing you that the system is now in diagnostic mode. Place a checkmark in the box that says, "Never show this dialog again". Not to worry, the next time you use the configuration utility, you will again be confronted with this dialog. I think Microsoft is in need of changing the statement to something a little less formidable like, "This dialog will never be seen again until you do anything in Windows".
  10. If the connection dialog doesn't rear it's ugly head, then you have stopped the program from loading which will call for it.

The next thing to do is to make the selection permanent. But before we get into that, you should read and understand the warning which comes with editing any system files. You should also know how to back up the registry files. For that, you will need to  seem my Registry page, "Bo's Tweaky Clean Windows".

The keys that you're looking for are as follows:

Fourth: Other reasons your computer wants to phone home
There are other reasons why a computer will attempt to dial out at startup. Because of a tight integration between Internet Explorer and the operating system, some IE options sometimes cause a dialup at startup, even if you use other browsers. You can disable these by using IE, selecting the Tools menu, choose Internet Options, select Advanced tab. In the Security section, unselect "Check for publisher's certificate revocation" and "Check for server certificate revocation."

Modem Attempts To Dial When Windows Starts
The information in this article applies to: Microsoft Windows 95 Microsoft Windows 98

IMPORTANT: This article contains information about editing the registry. Before you edit the registry, make sure you understand how to restore it if a problem occurs. For information about how to do this, view the "Restoring the Registry" Help topic in Regedit.exe or the "Restoring a Registry Key" Help topic in Regedt32.exe for Windows 2000 and NT or simply check out, "Bo's Tweaky Clean Windows".

SYMPTOMS When you start Windows, your modem may attempt to connect to your Internet service provider (ISP). CAUSE This behavior can occur for any of the following reasons: When you use a program that automatically checks for updated components or Web pages.

When a program that dials your ISP is located in the StartUp folder.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\OLE\EnableRemoteConnect RESOLUTION WARNING:

Warning: Using Registry Editor incorrectly can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that problems resulting from the incorrect use of Registry Editor can be solved. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.

To resolve this behavior, use one of the following methods.

To do this, refer to the documentation that is included with the program. Remove Programs That Dial into Your ISP from the StartUp Folder Remove the programs that automatically check for updated components or Web pages from the StartUp folder: Right-click Start, and then click Open.

How to Remove the System32.exe Trojan Horse Virus Delete or rename the System32.exe file in the Windows\System folder.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run In the right pane, right-click the SystemHandler value, and then click Delete.

How to Remove the Trojan.Win32.Bymer Virus
To resolve this issue, remove the Wininit.exe file from the C:\Windows\System folder. How to Modify Symantec WinFax or HotFax Message Center Close WinFax and the Controller, or close or HotFax Message Center.

Reconfigure your modem in WinFax or HotFax Message Center.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run

How to Remove the MSDTC Service from the StartUp Folder

To remove the MSDTC service from the StartUp folder:

If you do not want to remove the MSDTC service from the StartUp folder, configure Internet Explorer to connect to your ISP by using a local area network (LAN). When you want to connect to the Internet, first connect to your ISP by using Dial-Up Networking, and then start Internet Explorer.

To configure Internet Explorer to use a LAN:

NOTE: If the MSDTC service is not loaded from the StartUp folder, remove the Msdtc value from the registry.
To do this:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\RunServices

RealAudio 5 Beta Is Installed on Your Computer

If you are using a beta version of RealAudio 5, your modem may automatically connect to your ISP.

To resolve this issue, remove the beta version of RealAudio, or upgrade to the released version of the product.

Registry Entry Is Set to Dial To resolve this issue, configure Internet Explorer to not connect by using a modem, or set the value in the

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\OLE\EnableRemoteConnect registry key to N.

WARNING: Some programs may configure the registry to dial automatically, and altering this registry value may impact these program's functionality.

To set the value in the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\OLE\EnableRemoteConnect registry key to N:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\OLE\EnableRemoteConnect


How to stop those annoying popups in MSIE

Mr. "T" asks:

How do I get rid of these pesky irritating pop up adds from Microsoft Internet Explorer???????Not associated with the program it says..................they are driving me NUTS!! They pop up several times while I'm typing or reading......the minute I turn to the Web they start showing up!!!

This seems to be an ever increasing problem. The issue arises when you visit some Web sites, and a new Internet Explorer window (or in some cases, multiple new browser windows) opens on your computer. These windows often contain advertisements, and in some cases, offensive content.

In order to prevent some popup adds, you need to disable Active Scripting.Here is how:

To add a site to the Restricted Sites zone in Internet Explorer:

  1. Start Internet Explorer.
  2. On the Tools menu, click Internet Options.
  3. Click the Security tab.
  4. Click Restricted Sites, and then click Sites.
  5. In the Add this Web site to the zone box, type the Web address for the site that you want to restrict, and then click Add. Repeat this step if you want to add other sites to the zone.
  6. Click OK.
  7. Click Default Level to set the Restricted Sites zone to the recommended level, which disables Active Scripting.
  8. Click OK.

Not all active scripting is a bad thing, BLCOW uses Active Scripting for most, but not all, of our sites. The navigation bars for example. Completely disabling all Active Scripting will render some sites, like ours, from opening properly.

There are many third party pieces of software that can be used to block specific types of Active Scripting. some of these are free and can be found on Bohunky0's Freeware From A-Z pages.

For more information and other important links, please see: Cyberbullying or Bullying Online.

For a good popup add blocker see:

pop up blocker - stop popups with free popup ad blocker

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Recovering Deleted Emails and Compacting your folders, the real delete

Many questions have come across my desk asking if deleted email messages are recoverable. In some instances they are not. If you have compacted your folders, explained in more detail below) then chances of retrieval are slim to none.

One freeware tool, which ewe have personally tested and loved, is Disk Investigator. this may give you a fighting chance to reclaim those emails you thought were gone. A good tool to use in conjunction with Disk Investigator is Clean Disk Securit. Both programs will show you what really is still on your system.

If you have money to burn there is a program on the market that claims to work, but only with Microsoft products. I do not generally advertise for pay programs especially those the should be provided by Microsoft or any vendor's product. But, as this is a common question to me, I will make this one exception with the understanding that I do not use this product, would not buy a specialty program for the price they are charging and tell you flat out, Disk Investigator will do the same thing, for nothing and it works with any deleted file or program. So, the program in question is called Search and Recover

Compacting -- the real delete

When you delete email, it doesn't get zapped immediately. Instead, it is first shunted to the Deleted Items or Trash folder from which you can retrieve it if need be. Once you empty the Trash or Deleted Items folder the emails are gone for good. Or so it seems. . .

But although the deleted emails are now out of your reach, your email program doesn't reclaim the space used by those emails until you compact your mail folders. When you compact your folders, not only do you regain wasted hard disk space, you'll often find it makes your email program run faster and may reduce the risk of your mail folders becoming damaged.

Here's how to reclaim that lost space:

[Outlook Express]

Click File Menu - Folder - Compact All Folders.

[Outlook]

  1. Right-click the topmost Personal Folders folder (the one which displays Outlook Today) and select Properties from the pop-up menu.
  2. Click the Advanced button.
  3. Click Compact Now.

[Netscape]

  1. Click Edit Menu - Preferences - Offline & Disk Space.
  2. Check the Compact Folders When It Will Save Over option and type in a value or accept the default of 100 kilobytes. Then click OK.

[Mozilla]

  1. Click Edit Menu - Preferences - Mail & Newsgroups - Offline & Disk Space.
  2. Check the Compact Folders When It Will Save Over option and type in a value or accept the default of 100 kilobytes. Then click OK.

[Eudora]

Click Special Menu - Compact Mailboxes.

[Pegasus]

Right-click a folder and choose Recover Deleted Space from the pop-up menu.

If it's been a long time since you compacted your folders and you receive a lot of email, the process may take quite a few minutes, so be prepared to wait.


Internet Explorer or Outlook Express Quits Unexpectedly with an Error in Mshtml.dll

Reader Marshall asks:

I am running IE6.For some reason and only on message boards, I get a message approx. every minute telling me that IE has found a problem and must close. The mod name of the error is mshtml.dll. I have deleted IE and added a new one but problem still persists. Any suggestion will be appreciated.

If you haven't already, go to the Microsoft Security site and download the correct version of the security patch. See site below: http://www.microsoft.com/windows/ie/downloads/security/mshtml.asp

Internet Explorer 6 requires Mshtml.dll version 6.0.2600.0. The error message may occur if you are using a different version of Mshtml.dll. An incorrect version of this dynamic-link library (DLL) can cause an access violation.

As you have already installed MSIE we can try this next approach. If the instructions below fail to give the desired results, then locate the Mshtml.dll file (Should be in C:\Windows\System32) and rename it to something like Mshtml.dll.old then reinstall MSIE so that the correct version will install.

Here is how to repair the problem:

Re-extract Mshtml.dll from the Internet Explorer version 6 cabs.

To do so, follow the steps listed for your operating system:

Microsoft Windows 98

  1. Click Start, click Run, type sfc, and then click OK.
  2. Click Extract one file, type ie_1.cab, and then click Start.
  3. In the Restore from field, type c:\windows\windows update setup files.
  4. In the Save as field, type c:\windows\windows update setup files, and then click OK.
  5. When you receive a prompt to back up the file to C:\Windows\Helpdesk\Sfc, click Yes or OK.
  6. If you receive the following prompt, click Yes or OK:

    The backup folder does not exist. Do you want to create it?

  7. If you receive a dialog box that says: "The file was successfully extracted", click OK.
  8. Click Start, click Run, type sfc, and then click OK.
  9. Click Extract one file, type mshtml.dll, and then click Start.
  10. In the Restore from field, type c:\windows\windows update setup files.
  11. In the Save as field, type c:\windows\system, and then click OK.
  12. When you receive a prompt to back up the file to C:\Windows\Helpdesk\Sfc, click Yes or OK.
  13. When you receive a dialog box that says: "The file was successfully extracted", click OK.
  14. Close System File Checker and then restart the computer.

Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition (Me)

  1. Click Start, click Run, type msconfig, and then click OK.
  2. Click Extract.
  3. Type ie_1.cab, and then click Start.
  4. In the Restore from field, type c:\windows\windows update setup files.
  5. In the Save as field, type c:\windows\windows update setup files, and then click OK.
  6. When you receive a prompt to back up the file to C:\Windows\Helpdesk\Sfc, click Yes or OK.
  7. If you receive the following prompt, click Yes or OK:

    The backup folder does not exist. Do you want to create it?

  8. If you receive a dialog box that says: "The file was successfully extracted", click OK.
  9. Click Start, click Run, type msconfig, and then click OK.
  10. Click Extract
  11. Type mshtml.dll, and then click Start.
  12. In the Restore from field, type c:\windows\windows update setup files.
  13. In the Save as field, type c:\windows\system, and then click OK.
  14. When you receive a prompt to back up the file to C:\Windows\Helpdesk\Sfc, click Yes or OK.
  15. When you receive a dialog box that says: "The file was successfully extracted", click OK.
  16. Close System File Checker and then restart the computer.

The file could be damaged or corrupted. This will remove the file and replace it with the correct version.

This behavior can also occur if you are using an older third-party video adapter driver.

If it is the video adapter, then you can go to the card manufacturer's website and get a version update. If the card is not at fault or even if it is this work-a-round will not do any harm:

Reduce the Color Palette setting in Display properties to 256 Color by using the following steps:

  1. Click Start, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. Double-click Display.
  3. Click the Settings tab.
  4. In the Color Palette box, click 256 Color.
  5. Click OK.
  6. Restart your computer when you are prompted to do so.

Though you do not mention it, if Microsoft Outlook Express experiences this problem as well, take a look at this MSKB article:

Internet Explorer or Outlook Express Quits Unexpectedly with an Error in Mshtml.dll


Can not enable coolies to view Hotmail account.

Reader Dave asks: I found your Website after I was searching for some help with enabling cookies.  I updated Windows and then when I tried to go to the homail page, particularly my inbox page, I was informed that I had to enable cookies.  Went through all the steps [Tools - Internet Options - Privacy - etc.]  Still not working.  What does someone do?  Input requested.

Possible Work-a-round: Hotmail is a service of MSN. I suggest that you go to their help, support and FAQ pages for your answer.

However, this seems to be a common problem and there may be a work-a-round for it. Give this a try:

  1. Open Internet Explorer 6
  2. In Internet Explorer, on the Tools menu,
    1. Click Internet Options.
    2. Click the Privacy tab, and then click Edit.
    3. In Address of Web site, type the complete address of the Web site for which you want to specify custom settings,

      for example: https://oem.microsoft.com/.
    4. Specify that you want Internet Explorer to always allow cookies from https://oem.microsoft.com/ to be saved on your computer,
    5. Click Allow.
    6. Click Okay
  3. Click Apply
  4. Click Okay

Problems Changing default HTM Icon

Reader John has been having problems changing the default icon for MSIE 6.0 using Windows XP Home Version.

Question: I reinstalled XP Home version and now all html files have only a default icon instead of the "html document" icon as seen in url.dll. The system also will not recognize any icon selected via the "change icon" operation from folder options.

After a couple of emails, John writes:

Before I actually do anything with your latest instructions I thought I should describe the other contents of the "htmlfile" folder since you are referring to the CLSID value {25336920-03F9-11cf-8FD0-00AA0068F13}. I was going to do this last time but was focused on the "prehandler" idea and didn't know if you would need it or not.

Ok, The list below defines the main folder and its subfolders. The contents of each subfolder follows its name in parentheses. The name of any subfolder, "of a subfolder", and its contents is listed after the contents of its parent folder;

MAIN FOLDER IS

htmlfile, ( 6 subfolders )

( htmlfile\ 6 subfolders named below )

SUBFOLDERS of "htmlfile" ARE

BrowseInPlace, ( Name = (Default), Type = REG_SZ, Data = blank, there is no data listed at all ) ( htmlfile\BrowseInPlace ) 

CLSID, ( Name = (Default), Type = REG_SZ, Data = {25336920-03F9-11cf-8FD0-00AA0068F13} ( htmlfile\CLSID

DefaultIcon, ( Name = (Default), Type = REG_SZ, Data = C:\WINDOWS\system32\dllcache\url.dll,0 ) ( htmlfile\DefaultIcon )

ScriptHostEncode, ( Name = (Default), Type = REG_SZ, Data = {0CF774D0-F077-11D1-B1BC-00C04F86C324}

( htmlfile\ScriptHostEncode )

Shell, ( Name = (Default), Type = REG_SZ, Data = opennew ). This folder has 7 sub folders, see note below. 

( htmlfile\Shell\ 7 subfolders not named here )

ShellEx, ( Name = (Default), Type = REG_SZ, Data = (value not set) ). This folder has 1 subfolder, IconHandler, ( Name = (Default), Type = REG_SZ, Data = {42042206-2D85-11D3-8CFF-005004838597} 

( htmlfile\ShellEx\IconHandler )

Note: Within the "Shell" subfolder there are 7 subfolders named after various applications, each having their own subfolders with commands to open or run the applications, are these what the IconHandler data is for? If you think you need the info. on these applications I can send it also.

I guess since there is a folder with the proper CLSID data, which you mention and a separate folder with the IconHandler data, the IconHandler is referring to the applications in the "Shell" subfolder as mentioned above? 

I don't mean to go over board with the detail, it's just that I am sure it would be very hard to diagnose a problem without knowing "exactly" what you are dealing with. Let me know if I should still do what you have already suggested.

Answer: First let me say that there is never too much information and this helps some.

The icon handler you describe is sometimes used, okay, almost always used, with Mozzila. If you have installed Mozilla recently this may be the culprit. While researching your problem, I couldn't remember ever answering such a question as this. Rummaging around through my old database I did come across a lady who, while this is not your problem, has something similar. She had downloaded and installed, on my advise, OpenOffice from OpenOffice.org an open source production suite comparable to Microsoft Office. However, on the setup wizard it listed an opportunity to open Office documents with OpenOffice which effectively changed the file associations. She chose this option and was unable to change the icons from those of Open Office back to Ms Office (I believe the latest build of OpenOffice doesn't do this). Long story short, it set up a permissions base which refused any attempt to change the icon.

Now, back to our case. The fact that there are subfolders for the HTMFile types is a dead giveaway that MSIE is not your only browser or program with browser capabilities. Thus my confusion and the DUH(!) moment. No matter, I confuse easy.

Now then, if you have installed Mozilla try this:
XP defines an 'icon handler' for files such as html files (This is so it can display different icons for html files created by other programs which share an 'open with' design). Now, it is possible to get rid of this icon handler so windows uses the icon we assign to html files, but only by using the registry editor: go to

HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\MozillaHTML\ShellEx\IconHandler, delete the '(Default)' key. (it's the CLSID {42042206-2D85-11D3-8CFF-005004838597} (Which points to a dll in Mozilla's default folder).

Also look at the following keys:

HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\MozillaHTML\DefaultIcon
may have a value of %1, which means use the file for the icon, which is nonsense because html files don't contain images themselves.Change that to your desired icon file C:\WINDOWS\system32\dllcache\url.dll,0 .

Furthermore, if you have the following keys...
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\MozillaHTML\ShellEx

HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\MozillaHTML\ShellEx\IconHandler
Default data is"{42042206-2D85-11D3-8CFF-005004838597}"
...a CLSID which contains icon settings for any filetype which is added to it.Deleting this key should make the problem go away.

It should be okay to delete this key value, but before you do be sure to back it up. I can not imagine why it should be needed, but these are the many vagaries that are Windows. One can never feel so cock sure of any diagnostic in which different setups on different machines might take into account. If it is backed up, and something goes haywire, you can easily reinstall it by going to the backed up REG file and double clicking on it. Reboot, and we are right back to square one none the worse for wear

 ShellEx, ( Name = (Default), Type = REG_SZ, Data = (value not set) ). This folder has 1 subfolder, IconHandler, ( Name = (Default), Type = REG_SZ, Data = {42042206-2D85-11D3-8CFF-005004838597} 

( htmlfile\ShellEx\IconHandler )

After you have made the changes, be sure to clear the dllcache or DllCache. This will not work until you do. Okay, let me rephrase that, it might not work until you do. Here's how:

  1. Click Start | Run and type CMD then click okay
  2. At the prompt type the following and hit your enter button on your keyboard:

    sfc /purgecache


    Note the space between the command SFC and the switch /
  3. Once done, type exit and reboot the system

If the default icon isn't back where it should be, the permission which prohibited you from assigning that icon for that file set should be gone and you should now be able to set the application file icon as normally you would.

If you have not installed Mozilla then go ahead and delete the key value above, it shouldn't be needed and in fact, is pointing to a default application icon installed somewhere on your system. You would be the one to know what that might be. Commonly this is a Mozilla problem and is actually calling for a permissions for a quoted association type. Removing the key should also remove the permission limitations.

This is a bit much to digest I know but I am sure that you can handle it. Let me know how you make out. If this isn't the problem, well, back to the old drawing board.

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Version Dec 7 Copyright 2001 Larry Blaisdell